Restaurant Owner, Manager & Employee Quotes In Support Of Smokefree Air

September 28, 2017

 

Dwight Fuhrman, State Commander, Pennsylvania Veterans of Foreign Wars (VFW)

"It is time for the state to end the smoking exemption for all facilities licensed by the Pennsylvania Liquor Control Board, including all private clubs. The Pennsylvania VFW wants to improve the health of all veterans, their loved ones and employees inside our clubs. Removing this exemption for all PLCB license holders will create an even playing field so there won’t be a competitive disadvantage for those clubs that become nonsmoking operations."

Quoted In:

Prose, J.D., "Poll: Pennsylvanians back expanding no-smoking laws to bars, casinos, clubs," Times Online, September 25, 2017.


Dirk Markel, General Manager, Granfalloons Tavern, York, PA

Re: voluntarily going smokefree: "We were a little hesitant for a while, but we were thinking about it. We thought: We're taking part in Restaurant Week. Let's do it. Let's try it and try to change a bit. People didn’t want to eat food in a smoking environment, and no one can blame them for that. We've gotten a lot of our customers that used to come here at 21, 22 years old; now they're 28 or 29, and they've come back. It's been about 98 percent positive."

Quoted In:

Machcinski, A.J., "One of York's last smoking bars bans cigarettes," ydr.com, March 3, 2017.


Mike Hoffman, Bartender, Waterway Bar and Grill, York, PA

Re: long term impact of going smokefree: "At first, people were upset, but then, shortly after, it didn't make a difference at all. You get new customers then because it's smoke free. People that normally wouldn't come in, come in now because it's a clean environment. I'd rather go outside and smoke. At least you get some fresh air. When I'm working behind a bar, it just affects your breathing and irritates your eyes. I love [non-smoking bars]."

Quoted In:

Machcinski, A.J., "One of York's last smoking bars bans cigarettes," ydr.com, March 3, 2017.


Mark Griffin, Owner, Griff's, Las Vegas, NV

"I'd had bad lungs for years, and spent my share of time in smoke-filled pool halls. But as a kid, we were playing in volcanic ash and throwing it in each other's faces, so who knows why I needed new lungs. I'm lucky to be alive now, and that’s why Griff's is nonsmoking. We wanted it all to be brand new, so the only thing that's original to the building is the ceiling grid and a couple of walls. The response to the no-smoking policy has been overwhelmingly positive. I have maybe 10 people a day saying thank you. They [smokers] can always go outside, and since more and more people are not smoking, I think we were just following a trend. And maybe I was being a little selfish, because I wanted a nice place where I could go, too. I don't think I would have opened Griff'’s if it was a smoking room."

Quoted In:

Birkin, D., "Pool hall is bucking Las Vegas tradition by going smokefree:
owner says customers are thankful," Vegas Inc, December 19, 2016.


Glen Keely, Co-Owner, Poag Mahone's, TX

On voluntarily going smokefree: "We looked into going no-smoking over a year ago. But when we posted about it on Facebook, the feedback was pretty negative, so we ixnayed that idea. ... I went to Poag's one night for some drinks, and the next morning, I was totally congested. When you're in a smoky environment all the time, I guess you just get used to it. But the way my clothes smelled, the way my body felt, that was pretty much it for me with having smoke inside the bar. We didn't want to piss people off, but it was time to rip the Band-Aid off. Leading up to it there were a lot of regulars who were pretty angry about us going no-smoking, saying how they'd never come back or whatever. But you know what? They're still filling their regular seats. I know it's early on, and the timing might be a factor because school is back in and all, but this past weekend was our busiest non-event Saturday since 2009. It was awesome to see the kids back. Most kids have probably never even been in smoky bars, because everywhere else [outside of Fort Worth], you can't smoke inside. My employees are a lot happier and so are our customers. I keep hearing how this person or that person quit coming to Poag's because of how smoky it was, and it's really nice to see those people back in the bar. Maybe we've lost a few regulars who are adamant about being able to smoke in a bar, and that sucks. … But it's a matter of employee health and customer service. And we have a lot of customers who are really happy we made the decision to go smoke-free."

Quoted In:

Steward, S., "Smoke-free Poag's: success," Fort Worth Weekly, September 22, 2016.


Chris Spinks, Marketing Director, Billy Bob's Texas Bar

On voluntarily going smokefree: "Smoking was an issue that was consistently brought up. We put this policy in place because of that."

Quoted In:

[n.a.], "Last call for smoking in Fort Worth bars," Fort Worth Star-Telegram, August 29, 2016.


Zach Kyle, Owner, Blind Pig, Franklin, IN

On voluntarily going smokefree: "A lot of people have been coming to this place long before it was my bar. I'm not trying to run off (smokers). I've heard some regulars say they won't come back if we go non-smoking, but that’s just a bullet I'll have to bite. Almost every place is non-smoking these days. When you go places that aren't non-smoking, it's a shock. We don't want to be the last of a dying breed left in the dust."

Quoted In:

[n.a.], "Bar makes change to draw new customers," Daily Journal, August 15, 2016.


Steve Watson, Co-owner, Kingpin, New Orleans, LA

"It's worked out really well. The initial month or so people were in shock. People weren't drinking as much."

Quoted In:

Price, T.A., "Little resistance to smoking ban at New Orleans bars a year later," Times-Picayune, April 21, 2016.


Joe Hall, Owner, Phil Brady's, Baton Rouge, LA

"It [a smokefree ordinance] can be done. Employees, people coming from out of town, tourists; they do not need to be in the bars and casinos with this going on."

Quoted In:

Weiss, B., "Group wants to ban smoking in bars, casinos across Baton Rouge," WBRZ, January 26, 2016.


An unnamed Outback Steakhouse Manager, Winter Park, FL

Regarding a voluntary smokefree patio policy: "We've actually increased traffic on our patio; we kind of revamped the patio itself and added an extra table. We are now up to 8 tables with a 40 seating capacity."

Quoted In:

Orozco, J., "Winter Park wants restaurants to offer 'smoke-free' patios," myfoxorlando.com, April 27, 2015.


Matthew Hayes, 700 Club, New Orleans, LA

"We're a small bar, so the smokiness in the air kept certain people away. We have more people who are actually coming to drink with us now."

Quoted In:

Walker, S., "VIDEO: Businesses, residents prepare for smoking ban in New Orleans," WDSU NewsChannel 6, April 8, 2015.


David Melius, Owner, Bruno Tavern, New Orleans, LA

"There have been cases of people choosing not to have parties here because they don't like all the smoking. We've also had good people we've wanted to hire but couldn’t because they don’t like all the smoke."

Quoted In:

Box, L., "Smoking ban welcomed by university-area bar owners," Uptown Messenger, February 19, 2015.


Mindy Jarrett, Bartender, The Boot, New Orleans, LA

"People don't come to The Boot to smoke; they come to drink with their college friends."

Quoted In:

Box, L., "Smoking ban welcomed by university-area bar owners," Uptown Messenger, February 19, 2015.


Harry Leche, General Manager, Fat Harry's, New Orleans, LA

On a voluntary smokefree policy: "A few regulars said they weren't coming back, but we gained new regulars because they like the smoke-free environment,"

Quoted In:

Box, L., "Smoking ban welcomed by university-area bar owners," Uptown Messenger, February 19, 2015.


Mary Lou Coddington, Owner, Palmer Bar, Palmer, AK

Regarding the economic impact of a voter-approved smokefree ordinance: "I don't know if it's better, but we have a lot of different people, and it's better in that respect. We have a lot of people who wouldn't come here before. It's steady." Coddington had opposed the law and stated, "I've been in the bar business a long, long time, and I couldn't imagine not having smoking. When you've been in the business that long and it's always been smoking, it's scary. Very scary. This is my living. They're [smokers] okay with it … now. They're all okay. They all go outside.”

Quoted In:

O'Connor, B., "Smoking law might change," Mat-Su Valley Frontiersman, January 24, 2015.


Greg Jones, General Manager, Oz Nightclub, New Orleans, LA

Regarding his experience at a New York City nightclub when a smokefree ordinance took effect: "However, once all was said and done, we saw no drop in our business. None at all." Jones was in favor of a proposed smokefree ordinance in New Orleans, stating, "Many of the tourists automatically do go outside and smoke and are quite surprised when we tell them that they can smoke inside. Most of the United States is educated to this and prefer to go outside and smoke."

Quoted In:

White, J., "With smoking ban in bars, New Orleans would be late in catching up with most of U.S.: nearly 82% of U.S. population lives with tobacco restrictions," New Orleans Advocate, January 20, 2015.


Kyle Stone, Co-owner, Brothers Bar and Grill, Kennett, MO

On voluntarily going smokefree: "We have a really nice outdoor patio, with a television, so (customers) can enjoy it and feel comfortable. It has helped our business, as far as non-smoking goes. We thought it would hurt it, but it did quite the opposite."

Quoted In:

Ford, L., "Brothers Bar and Grill: great food, smoke-free," Daily Dunklin Democrat, November 25, 2014.



Christopher Anthony, Restaurant/Bar Owner, Shreveport, LA

On smokefree air: "You don't want to go home smelling like second hand smoke, so it is a good idea." Anthony paid extra for a restaurant license so his establishment would be smokefree and said, "That way I can have families come in and not have to worry about smoking. Oh yeah I still get a packed house every night."

Quoted In:

Shirley, V., "Reaction mixed about idea of smoke-free bars, casinos in Shreveport-Bossier," KSLA-TV, November 20, 2014.


Craig Klein, Member of Bonerama

Regarding a proposed smokefree ordinance in New Orleans: "To play in a club that is full of smoke, it's hard to play. Now is the time to try to pass this smoke-free environment. It's so much easier to play in a club without the smoke. It's a challenge to play as a musician. ... It's a no-brainer in New Orleans. You can walk outside and have a drink with your cigarette. It's so simple. ... It's nothing personal with smokers. You want to smoke a cigarette, that's fine. It's personal if you want to smoke a cigarette in front of me while I'm playing my instrument."

Quoted In:

Woodward, A., "LaToya Cantrell to introduce smoke-free legislation Nov. 20," Gambit Blog of New Orleans, November 12, 2014.


Justin Mastry, Owner, Mastry's, St. Petersburg, FL

On making his bar smokefree: "Smoking seems to be a dying thing of the past, eventually everywhere will be no smoking indoors. My dad loves it - grandfather probably rolled over in his grave and then said, 'Ah it's for the best in the long run. This place has a long history of being a stinky smoky dive bar. I'd be standing behind this bar every night and groups of people would come in, covering their faces, shake their heads, turn around and leave. We've been even keel - people said oh that'll kill business and no one will every come again ... only time will tell."

Quoted In:

Hagen, S., "Mastry's, landmark St. Pete bar, bans smoking," WTSP 10 News, October 2, 2014.


Becky Vibbart, Manager, Humphrey's Bar & Grill, Huntsville, AL

Following a poll conducted via social media and the decision to implement a smokefree policy: "We just felt like it was a sign of the times and we wanted the majority of the people to be heard." Regarding including electronic cigarettes in the policy, Vibbart stated, "It's kind of been set in California and over in Oregon and in Washington, so we're just going to set the standard for ourselves and just say no vaping and no smoking right from the start."

Quoted In:

Killimayer, C., "Smoking bans trending in downtown restaurants, but not all eliminate vaping," WHNT 19 News, July 7, 2014.


Chris McDonald, Chef-Owner, Humphrey's Bar & Grill; and the Bottle, Huntsville, AL

Following a poll conducted via social media and the decision to implement a smokefree policy: "Eighty percent of the people that were polled wanted us to go non-smoking. And even people that haven't been here before, would say they would come to Humphrey's if it was a non-smoking establishment." Regarding making his adjacent restaurant, the Bottle, smokefree: "We saw an increase in our sales. We had new customers, new guests I should say, that came in and thanked us for going non-smoking that they've been wanting to come in, but they just can't tolerate the smoke and they will not."

Quoted In:

Killimayer, C., "Smoking bans trending in downtown restaurants, but not all eliminate vaping," WHNT 19 News, July 7, 2014.


Colby Van Cleave, Owner, Lucky's Pub, Cypress, TX

Regarding implementing a smokefree policy: "I had people questioning me from the start on whether I made the right decision. I never questioned the decision, and it was confirmed as soon as I opened my doors. People were immediately giving positive feedback about us being smoke-free."

Quoted In:

Arrajj, S., "Smoking bans become more popular among Cy-Fair businesses," Community Impact Newspaper, February 19, 2014.


Mark McShaffry, Owner, Backyard Grill and Backyard Smokehouse, TX

Regarding implementing a smokefree policy: "We promote ourselves as a family restaurant, and having [smoking] here didn't really make sense. There are people out there that knew we were a smoking restaurant and didn't come because of that. In the long run, we think more will start coming soon after they hear we're non-smoking. Either way, I still think it was the right choice, just for the kids."

Quoted In:

Arrajj, S., "Smoking bans become more popular among Cy-Fair businesses," Community Impact Newspaper, February 19, 2014.


Felix Landrum, Owner, Cafe Felix in Ann Arbor, MI

"Business has nearly tripled. Our clientele has thrived without cigarettes." Prior to the smokefree law, Landrum stated, "We'd have to wash the walls. Your hair and clothes would stink."

Quoted In:

Martinez, M., "Michigan businesses forced to go smoke-free seeing positive results," Detroit News, August 8, 2013.


Justin Winslow, Vice President for Government Affairs, Michigan Restaurant Association

"I think a lot of businesses have acclimated. There was a recalibration that was difficult for some smaller bars. There was certainly a culture change that people had to adjust to."

Quoted In:

Martinez, M., "Michigan businesses forced to go smoke-free seeing positive results," Detroit News, August 8, 2013.


Karen Schnorr, Manager Richards Restaurant, Columbia, IN

"Business has been up and I've seen customers we've not seen for three to five years that will come in now sometimes two and three times a week. Some of them [smokers] will come in and go outside and have their cigarette and they still come in and have lunch maybe not as often as they were, but they are still here a couple times a week. It is nice to have a new, clean restaurant that doesn't stink and you don't go home as non-smokers smelling like smoke."

Quoted In:

Reust, M., "One year later business booming after statewide smoking ban," WANE, July 1, 2013.


Jim Mondanaro, Owner, Fresh Food Concepts and several restaurants and bars in the Iowa City area

"The smoke-free air law has been nothing but positive for my businesses. It is better for everyone involved in the food and beverage industry - it protects the health of my workers and guests, and even prevents wear and tear on my buildings previously caused by cigarette smoke. Overall, this law has been a great success."

Quoted In:

Boshart, R., "Iowa's smoke-free air law marks five-year anniversary," Gazette, June 30, 2013.


Craig Smith, Owner, Revolutions, Myrtle Beach, SC

On implementing a smokefree policy in the dance club: "I can't please everybody unfortunately. I want to. But the overall success and the overall comments that I have received has been more favorable than the negative comments. We started listening to our guests for about the past 30 days and the majority of them wanted to see if we would try going smoke free so we listened to them and that's why we're doing it. Basically a lot of the guests that we have coming down here are from various parts of the United States and the majority of them they can't smoke in any of the places where they're at so they're used to it so it's kind of the norm for them."

Quoted In:

Edge, L., "Revolutions nightclub joins the smoke free party," Carolina Live, May 2, 2013.


Brian Maloof, Owner, Manuel's Tavern, Atlanta, GA

Maloof noted that he had fought against a proposed statewide smokefree air measure, but now had no doubt that permitting smoking was harming his business and said, "I know definitely in January of 2014, we'll be 100 percent smoke-free."

Quoted In:

Caldwell, C., "Longtime Atl. bar that fought smoking ban opts to go smoke-free," Atlanta Business Chronicle, April 1, 2013.


Jack Borgmeyer, Co-owner, Grappa Grill, St. Charles, MO

On implementing a voluntary smokefree policy: "Over the years we have heard the rising complaints from our patrons and felt that it was move that had to be made."

Quoted In:

Ponche, K., "Grappa Grill goes smoke free: restaurant partner Jack Borgmeyer says he's responding to requests from customers," St. Charles Patch, March 4, 2013.


Angela Corpening, Golden Light, Amarillo, TX

On going smokefree: "We started it in May and I think it's done nothing but help our business. We're a family restaurant and I wanted families to feel comfortable to bring their kids and stuff in here. So I think it's done nothing but help."

Quoted In:

[n.a.], "Potential smoking ban impact on Amarillo," KFDA, January 7, 2013.


Megan Mele, Co-owner, Gold Crown Billiards, VA

"The first six to eight months was a total transition because our regular clients were coming in and they couldn't smoke anymore. They had to go outside. But, at the same time we gained so many new clientele that would have never come here before because we were a smoking establishment. ... So I have to say it's been extremely positive on the outcome over the past three years. We've been able to open different avenues as far as a full music venue, a full menu at the bar, just because we've gone non smoking."

Quoted In:

Nahmias, A., "Restaurant owners saw increased business three years after smoking ban," WHSV.com, December 10, 2012.


Wasfi Samaan, Owner, JD Legends, Nicholasville, KY

"I should have done this years ago. I think everyone is better for it; I feel better; my employees feel better and are more productive, and when we come home after a long day, we all don't smell or feel like we smoked 40 packs of cigarettes."

Quoted In:

Rossi, B.S., "JD Legends hosts meeting of Smoke-Free Kentucky group," centralkynews.com, September 26, 2012.


Manuel Macias, Bartender, Crunchy's, MI

"Actually, it's improved with families. We have seen a lot more families come in throughout the day and on game days. It's just a clean healthy environment where people can come enjoy the game. The health benefits alone have been a huge plus when it comes to business, especially in a place like this. It's confined people don't want to be around a smoking area."

Quoted In:

Perreault, N., "Local businesses see a profit after smoking ban," WLNS TV 6, September 18, 2012.


Randy Farlin, Manager, Dagwood's Tavern, MI

"In general, maybe the food business is up a bit, but everything else stayed on the same course."

Quoted In:

Perreault, N., "Local businesses see a profit after smoking ban," WLNS TV 6, September 18, 2012.


Brian Peabody, Owner, Peabody's Billiards and Games, Tampa Bay, FL

On voluntarily going smokefree: "The idea of my kids having to go into our own business and be exposed to smoking was just unacceptable. ... I wish I had taken this step sooner. We have not even suffered a bump in the road since making the decision to forbid smoking at the establishment. It is truly an amazing transformation for us, and the customers are loving it."

Quoted In:

Knight, K., "Tampa Palms game room goes smoke-free," Tampa Bay Online, August 8, 2012.


Wesley Clemons, Governor, Revere, Massachusetts, Moose Lodge

"I'm glad we're a leader on this and being innovators and doing our part to help turn the city around. This is new and we are the first to do it. I've seen a few new faces already because we've gone non-smoking here. The tide is turning all over. As we go on, everywhere you go will be non-smoking. Even in Italy, you have to go outside to smoke now. You're just seeing more non-smokers these days because not only is it too expensive, but also people realize the health problems associated with it."

Quoted In:

Daniels, S., "Moose Club members vote to ban smoking," Revere Journal, August 1, 2012.


Paul DiPlatzi, Member, Revere, Massachusetts, Moose Lodge

"The young people especially don't like the smoking. They don't even want to be around it and they won't come here if there's a lot of smoking. This is a small building and it was just too much. Even the smokers told us it was just too much. Most people who voted non-smoking were smokers. They couldn't breath in here themselves."

Quoted In:

Daniels, S., "Moose Club members vote to ban smoking," Revere Journal, August 1, 2012.


Greg Jacquay, Owner of Trion Tavern - New Haven, Indiana

"We went smoke-free on our own. We can allow smoking, but we have 58 craft beers on tap and craft beers and smoking just don’t go together. I’ve had no one respond to me negatively. For me, it was just a good business decision."

Quoted In:

Hacha-Thomas, N., "City eateries adjusting to new smoking ban," Fort Wayne Daily News, July 20, 2012.



Rita Dunfee, Manager, Salvatori’s Authentic Italian Eatery - New Haven, Indiana

"We only had six or seven regular customers in the smoking section at any one time. Because our restaurant is open enough and we didn’t have a separately enclosed smoking section, we’re busier now that we can use the smoking section for the non-smokers."

Quoted In:

Hacha-Thomas, N., "City eateries adjusting to new smoking ban," Fort Wayne Daily News, July 20, 2012.


Dirk Leach, Co-owner of The Cafe in Graford, Texas,

Regarding a voluntary smokefree policy: "Our business was good before. We did this one week ago and our business probably went up 15 percent. We're seeing people here we've never seen. We opened up Wednesday (July 11) non smoking and we already had to hire [a waitress] because it's been so busy. For every one against, we've had 100 for it. You can see it because of increased business."

Quoted In:

Cluett, L., "Cafe owners say business has increased since going smoke-free," Mineral Wells Index, [July 19, 2012].


Pete Hanson, Director of Public Affairs, Wisconsin Restaurant Association

"It wasn't a boon to our industry, but it doesn't seem to have hurt our sales." Overall, Hanson said the state smokefree law "has been positive for the restaurant industry. It's been great for the health of our employees and customers."

Quoted In:

Bauter, A., "As smoking ban marks second year, restaurant business is up," Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, July 6, 2012.


Danny Sirounis, Owner, Commander Restaurant, Munster, IN

On his business increasing after going smokefree: "It is a healthier environment. Before we had people saying they wouldn’t come
in with kids or older people. I do think that Indiana copped out by not going completely smoke free; there are too many loopholes."

Quoted In:

Poulton, D., "Local biz owners see few side effects from smoking ban," nwitimes.com, July 1, 2012.



Ron Bullard, Owner, Bullshippers Cafe, Logansport, IN

On the impact of the state's smokefree air law: "It hasn't hurt us at all. In fact, it helped us. We should have done this a long time ago."

Quoted In:

Huston, C., "Locals report little impact from smoking ban," Pharos-Tribune, July 20, 2012.


Sharon Burke, Owner, Poodie’s Hilltop Roadhouse, Spicewood, TX

On voluntarily going smokefree: “I’ve been thinking about this over the whole last year. Everyone’s pretty supportive of the change. Most of my patrons are so happy to see this bar alive and honoring the tradition Poodie left. My staff just became so sick after the weekends. Musicians wouldn’t come in because of the smoke, so patrons won’t come in.”

Quoted In:

Miles, C., "Poodie’s Hilltop Roadhouse in Spicewood initiates smoking ban," Community Impact, June 25, 2012.


Doug Moore, Manager, Kegler's sports bar and bowling alley, WV

Asked if Monongalia County, West Virginia's smokefree ordinance had been bad for business, Moore said, "Personally, I don't think it has. And through the numbers, it hasn't. I think it's actually brought some more people in."

Quoted In:

Rippin, K., "Monongalia County smoking ban check-in," WBOY.com, May 16, 2012.


Richard O’Gara, Director, Wyoming Center for Business & Economic Analysis

Regarding Cheyenne, Wyoming's smokefree ordinance: "We didn’t see any bars or restaurants close down because of the ban. Actually, there were increases in sales and revenues."

Quoted In:

Byer, K., "Standing on a ‘slippery slope’ of evidence," Casper Star-Tribune, April 22, 2012.


Nate Jorgenson, Owner, Library Bar, Laramie, WY

"It’s just been so long since we’ve had it [smokefree ordinance] that it’s just generally accepted that you don’t smoke in bars now."

Quoted In:

Byer, K., "Standing on a ‘slippery slope’ of evidence," Casper Star-Tribune, April 22, 2012.


Adeline Bui, Co-owner, Hanovers Draught Haus, Pflugerville, TX

"We think that the greater good will come [of the smokefree policy]. Everybody loves us. The only thing they don't like is the smoke. We started getting a lot of complaints from our nonsmokers, that this place just reeks. They open the front door, and it's just like this wind of smoke right in their face."

Quoted In:

Rasmussen, B., "Mayor: Pflugerville not likely to tackle smoking ban in near future," Community Impact, April 6, 2012.


Stuart Robertson, Owner, MacNiven's Restaurant & Bar, Indianapolis, IN

On voluntarily going smokefree: "It's become more mainstream now. MacNiven's didn’t change one bit because of it. We've been very, very pleased with the results. And the servers like leaving not smelling like smoke. ... If bars in Scotland have been non-smoking for four or five years, then we’ve gotta catch up. If we want to be an international place, we’ve got to change."

Quoted In:

Schedler, C., "Smoking bans pick up steam as attitudes shift," Post-Tribune, March 3, 2012.


Sam Sanchez, Owner of Sam's All-American Sports Grill in Hillsboro Village, TN

After reviewing social media and customer surveys that indicated 81 percent of respondents said they didn't go to Sam's because of the people smoking around them, and even 44 percent of smokers saying they would prefer a smokefree bar, Sanchez decided to make his establishment smokefree. Sanchez stated, "We just could not ignore the data we got. It was such a shocking number. Then, we started really paying attention to all our reviews online. Again, people liked the bar, but didn't like the smoke."

Quoted In:

Quinn, E., " Sam's Sports Grill goes smoke-free," Tennessean, February 29, 2012.



Alex Torres, Owner of 12South Taproom in Hillsboro Village, TN

On voluntarily being smokefree: "Just from a consumer standpoint, I don't want to go somewhere that smells like smoke."

Quoted In:

Quinn, E., " Sam's Sports Grill goes smoke-free," Tennessean, February 29, 2012.


Jim Eaton, Bartender, Old Point Tavern, Indianapolis, IN

On voluntarily going smokefree: "It's actually increased our business for both lunch and dinner. It's probably dropped off a little bit for the late at night crowd, but nothing noticeable as far as the overall total of the day and night totals go." When asked if there were any chance that the bar would go back to permitting smoking, Eaton replied: "No, none whatsoever. Nope. Never happen." Eaton added: "It's just time for Indiana to get on the bandwagon with everybody else, and realize it is a health issue."

Quoted In:

Barras, D., "Smoke-free bars won't turn back," WISHTV, February 29, 2012.


Erik Muehlhausen, Manager, MacNiven's, Indianapolis, IN

On voluntarily going smokefree: "It's been over a month since we've gone non-smoking, and we still have people come in and say, ‘Thank-you for going non-smoking. We always used to want to come in, but we didn't want to go home smelling like smoke, and now we're here and we're going to be in a lot more. We're incredibly happy with our decision and I think we're going to stay the course."

Quoted In:

Barras, D., "Smoke-free bars won't turn back," WISHTV, February 29, 2012.


Michael Strosnider, smoker and patron of MacNiven's, Indianapolis, IN

On the bar's voluntary smokefree policy: "If I could sit here and smoke, I've done had probably two or three cigarettes, but beings as I can't, I haven't. It's a plus."

Quoted In:

Barras, D., "Smoke-free bars won't turn back," WISHTV, February 29, 2012.


K.C. Chesser, KC's Time Out Lounge, Evansville, IN

"I've had a record week. Honestly, if I had known that is was going to bring me this much business, I would have went no smoking a long time ago. It's going real well."

Quoted In:

Erbacher, M., "For one bar owner, going smoke-free has been good for business: wouldn't change city ordinance -- for now," Evansville Courier Press, February 28, 2012.


Jeanne Ludington, Spokesperson, Cracker Barrel

On the chain's smokefree policy: "We care about the health and welfare of our guests and employees."

Quoted In:

[n.a.], "Cracker Barrel goes smoke free," NewsPressNow.com, February 17, 2012.


Leonard Hoops, Head, Indianapolis Convention and Visitors Association, IN

Regarding a proposed smokefree ordinance: "When it comes to restaurants and bars, I think it catches us up with some of our competitive cities. And when it comes to hotel rooms, if they go 100% smoke-free, that would be a big competitive advantage because not many other cities, even ones with smoking bans, have that position."

Quoted In:

Milz, M., "Council fails to override mayor's smoking ban," WTHR.com, February 13, 2012.


Patrick Pearse McAleese, Owner, Kells Irish Restaurant and Pub, Seattle, WA

In support of the state's smokefree air law and in opposition a proposal to weaken it: "Since voters approved a statewide indoor-smoking ban in 2005, Washington's bars, restaurants and public places have become cleaner and healthier for customers and employees alike. As the owner of a popular Irish bar in Seattle's Pike Place Market, I certainly don't miss the days I went home with watery eyes and smelling of smoke, and neither do the vast majority of my servers, bartenders and patrons. ... Some bar and restaurant owners, originally concerned that the Clean Indoor Air Act might hurt business, have come to appreciate its merits, and are now wary of turning back the clock on secondhand smoke protections for their customers and staff. Given overwhelming public sentiment opposed to reintroducing indoor smoking, they should be. ... The current Clean Indoor Air law is working to protect everyone's right to breathe clean air. Secondhand smoke is a proven health hazard. It doesn't make sense to change current standards to allow cigar smoking in public places. While I respect and appreciate the desire of some bar and restaurant owners to create a specialized atmosphere for a niche clientele, the broader risks to health and potential future rollbacks for other groups (pipe smokers, clove cigarettes? Medical marijuana?) are simply too great. ... Washington's Clean Indoor Air law is effective, fair and popular. Legislators should ignore the smoke screen from a few lobbyists and keep their focus on protecting public and workplace health."

Quoted In:

Pearse McAleese, P., "Lawmakers should ignore attempt to allow cigar loophole to indoor-smoking ban," Seattle Times, January 23, 2012.


Gus Kallas, Owner, The Albany, Cheyenne, WY

Regarding patron behavior after implementation of a smokefree ordinance: "They resigned themselves to the fact that they can still smoke, they just have to go outside to do so. It made my life better. It made everybody’s life better."

Quoted In:

Wolfson, J., "Smoking ban gains acceptance in Cheyenne," Star-Tribune, January 1, 2012.


Myron Langhoff, Owner, Two Bar Bowl, Cheyenne, WY

Re: patron behavior after implementation of a smokefree ordinance: "It’s just automatic. If you are a smoker, you go outside."

Quoted In:

Wolfson, J., "Smoking ban gains acceptance in Cheyenne," Star-Tribune, January 1, 2012.


Leonard Hoops, CEO and President, Indianapolis Convention & Visitors Association (ICVA)

"Eliminating smoking in Indianapolis' hospitality industry will benefit the region's convention and tourism industry. A smoke-free law will not only help us attract new business, but will enhance the visitors' experience while protecting hospitality workers from secondhand smoke."

Quoted In:

Indianapolis Convention & Visitors Association, "ICVA supporting smoking ban," InsideINdianaBusiness.com, December 9, 2011.


Richard Nicklos, Former bar owner, Linton, ND

Nicklos owned a bar in Linton for 27 years before he was diagnosed with asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and his failing health forced him to sell his business. Today, Nicklos takes nebulizer treatments, inhalers and multiple prescription medications to manage his diseases. Nicklos stated, "I am living proof that secondhand smoke is as hazardous as the real smoke," Nicklos said. "So you aren't in my shoes someday, we need to take cigarette smoke outside."

Quoted In:

[n.a.], "Linton looks at a smoke-free community," BreatheND Web Site - http://www.breathend.com/news/LintonLooksataSmokeFreeCommunity/, December 6, 2011.


Deran Piatz, Manager, Downtowner, Napoleon, ND

Regarding the impact of a smokefree ordinance: "Going smoke free doesn't seem to bother the smokers and it sure is nice to come home and not smell of smoke. It's a better place to work now and I can't imagine going back to the way it used to be."

Quoted In:

[n.a.], "Linton looks at a smoke-free community," BreatheND Web Site - http://www.breathend.com/news/LintonLooksataSmokeFreeCommunity/, December 6, 2011.


Paul Stone, President & CEO, N.C. Restaurant and Lodging Association

"The N.C. Restaurant and Lodging Association (NCRLA) is thrilled with the N.C. Division of Public Health's report that heart attacks are down 21 percent since the smoking ban in restaurants and bars went into effect in January 2010, as you reported on Nov. 9. Although certainly other factors contributed to this decrease, the elimination of smoking in North Carolina's restaurants and bars is rightly given credit as the biggest factor. NCRLA proudly supported this legislation. Not only are the vast majority of North Carolina citizens happy with the new law, restaurants and bars have seen no lasting negative effect since the ban. In fact, many establishments have experienced an uptick in business since January, 2010."

Quoted In:

Stone, P., "Ban's benefits," News & Observer, November 22, 2011.


Eric Geffre, Manager, WakeSide Bar and Grill, ND

"We were doing a remodel, and cigarette smoke ruins everything, plus my parents can't stand the smell of smoke, so we decided to make the whole place smoke-free."

Quoted In:

McDermott, C., "Smoke free, business hasn't declined," Daily News, October 11, 2011.


Bruce Kalliokoski, Owner, Brewski's, ND

"People who worked here got tired of the smoke. And, more and more, customers asked for it. We listened to what they had to say. They were loving the fresh air in Grand Forks bars and not going home with their clothes and hair smelling. We feel like the trend is going in the no-smoking direction, so why not get on board? I think you're going to see it nationwide in five years."

Quoted In:

Bakken, R., "Ryan Bakken: smoke-free without the regulations," Grand Forks Herald, August 21, 2011.


Carl D. Fox, Co-Owner, Crazy Fox Saloon, KY

On going smokefree indoors despite the repeal of a smokefree ordinance: "This is a huge change for us, but for us, it's about the health and well-being of our employees."

Quoted In:

Joering Alley, A. Mayhew, C., "Smoking ban repeal not stopping local businesses from going smokefree," cincinnati.com, 2011.


Angela Jimenez, General Manager, Buckhead Mountain Grill, KY

"I stood by the door on our busiest nights, and I would say it was about 1 in 40 people that wanted to sit in smoking. It just tells me that's what the guests want, and it's better for business."

Quoted In:

Joering Alley, A. Mayhew, C., "Smoking ban repeal not stopping local businesses from going smokefree," cincinnati.com, 2011.


Jana Cunningham, Floor Manager, Patton Alley Pub, Springfield, MO

On economic impact of a voter-approved smokefree ordinance: "We have actually got a little bit more business from people who would typically not have come out on a smoky, late weekend night."

Quoted In:

Landis, M., "Smoking ban 'worst case scenario' may not be happening in Springfield: opponents claimed law would have negative impact on local economy," KY3 News, July 29, 2011.


Vincent Oliva, Commander, Veterans of Foreign Wars (VFW) Post 8164, Tewksbury, MA

On adopting a tobacco-free policy: "This unanimous decision of the post board of directors was reached after much consideration and is the result of many factors, the most important ones being our desire to provide the healthiest environment for our members and patrons. We anticipate the decision to go non-smoking will make visiting the post and the members social club a more enjoyable, healthy and pleasurable experience for everyone. We hope the decision to become a non-smoking facility will encourage more veterans and residents to visit the post and consider becoming a member. VFW Post 8164 NO SMOKING policy covers all tobacco products, including cigarettes, cigars, pipes, chewing tobacco, and the new electronic cigarettes."

Quoted In:

Oliva, V., "VFW adopts 'no smoking' policy, effective today: Board of Directors explains the decision," Tewksbury Patch, July 1, 2011.


Jeanne McEvoy, Director, Colorado Licensed Beverage Association

On the economic impact of the state's smokefree air law after five years: "We never hear about smoking from members. It is, excuse the pun, a back-burner issue." McEvoy noted that bars have not been closing and that a member had told her that even if the smokefree law was repealed, he would not permit smoking in his bar.

Quoted In:

Philipps, D., "Smoking ban has improved business, health many Coloradans say," Gazette, June 30, 2011.


Ben Jackson, General Manager, The Ritz Grill, CO

On the state's smokefree air law after five years: “It’s been great for us. You don’t go home stinking of smoke and have a smoker’s cough even though you don’t smoke. Business is better. We have more people, even smokers, who stay and dance all night because it is not so smoky."

Quoted In:

Philipps, D., "Smoking ban has improved business, health many Coloradans say," Gazette, June 30, 2011.


Mark Dougherty, Owner, Mark's East Side, WI

"We started seeing new faces, people we hadn't seen in a long time, and they came there because it was smoke-free."

Quoted In:

Hrapsky, C., "Statewide smoking ban has mixed results," WBAY-TV, June 21, 2011.


Sam Khashan, Co-Owner, Sean O'Callaghan's, MI

On the state's smokefree air law: "It hasn't affected us at all. I think more people are happy. I expected a lot more complaints, a lot of trouble policing it, and we don't encounter that."

Quoted In:

Jachman, M., "In Plymouth: bar, restaurant workers toast smoking ban," Observer & Eccentric - hometownlife.com, May 19, 2011.


Kevin Montagano, Owner, Rock Bar and Grill, MI

On the state's smokefree air law: "I don't think it's had much of an impact."

Quoted In:

Jachman, M., "In Plymouth: bar, restaurant workers toast smoking ban," Observer & Eccentric - hometownlife.com, May 19, 2011.


Lee Kempisty, General Manager, Bennigan's, MI

On the economic impact of the state's smokefree air law: "It really has not affected too much of our business. I've really had no pushback. Sales for us right now are getting better." Kempisty added the business has saved in energy costs for its ventilation system: "The air doesn't have to work nearly as hard as it did before."

Quoted In:

Jachman, M., "In Plymouth: bar, restaurant workers toast smoking ban," Observer & Eccentric - hometownlife.com, May 19, 2011.


Jamie Justin, Bartender, Hermann's Olde Town Grille, MI

"I love the smoking ban. I think it's great."

Quoted In:

Jachman, M., "In Plymouth: bar, restaurant workers toast smoking ban," Observer & Eccentric - hometownlife.com, May 19, 2011.


Charlotte Skinner, Day Manager, T.P. Crockmiers, Mobile, AL

"It’s been going really great. We are getting a lot more families and people who would not come before because of the smoke."

Quoted In:

Andrews, C., "Hundreds more Mobile eateries now smoke-free," Press-Register, May 9, 2011.


Felicia Durbin, Owner, Judy's Castle, Bowling Green, KY

On voluntarily going smokefree: "We've had nothing but good from it. The customers that are big time smokers they just step outside and they don't have a problem with it. It's not affected our business in the least."

Quoted In:

Dawson, A., "For one restaurant, smoking ban no big deal: while some business owners may be worried about the effect on business the ban may have, one restaurant owner says "fear not"," abc13, April 28, 2011.


Angela Jimenez, General Manager, Buckhead Mountain Grill, KY

"Even though the smoking ban was repealed, we have decided to listen to our guests and what they want. The numbers were staggering in the data we collected and we believe it to be in the best interest of our guests and our business to take the leap and go smoke-free."

Quoted In:

O'Keefe, P.J., "Another N.Ky. restaurant goes smoke-free," Kentucky Post, April 5, 2011.


Louie Riederer, Owner, Johnny’s Tavern chain, Kansas

On opening one of his bars in Olathe, after the implementation of a smokefree ordinance: "We were just unbelievably successful there. Even smokers said they enjoyed the smoke-free atmosphere. I think you need to change with the times, change with what is going on."

Quoted In:

Bavley, A., "Restaurant air is far cleaner since Kansas imposed smoking ban, study finds," Kansas City Star, January 22, 2011.


Kirk Syberg, Owner, Syberg's, Maryland Heights, MO

"It has affected us in a positive manner. Our sales are up. We haven't lost any of our regulars; everyone knew the ban was coming so it wasn't a shock. Some new customers have come in saying they've been waiting for the ban."

Quoted In:

Siegel, V., "Restaurants and bars continue to attract customers despite smoking ban: Maryland Heights establishments see little change in customer base after the county smoking ban went into effect," Patch.org, January 14, 2011.


Paul M. Stone, President and CEO, N.C. Restaurant and Lodging Association

"The consensus is that this ban has had an overall positive effect on restaurants and hotels in North Carolina. It also has been very well received from the public."

Quoted In:

Ostendorf, J., "Smoke-free law seen as good for restaurant business in Asheville area, NC: more dining out after NC ban; study shows bar, eatery air quality up 89%," Asheville Citizen-Times, January 3, 2011.


Pete Hanson, Director of Government Relations for the Wisconsin Restaurant Association

"The smoke-free law has been very well received by restaurants and customers, so we're not surprised by the high compliance rate. Overall the restaurants we've talked to are happy with the smoke free law and indicated that they wouldn't go back, even if they could."

Quoted In:

Wisconsin Restaurant Association, "Wisconsin Restaurant Association: Statewide smoke-free law well received by restaurants and customers," wispolitics.com, November 17, 2010.


Chuck Lacy, Owner, Frogmore's Steak and Steamer, SC

"People seem to be enjoying the smoke-free environment. Given our size, it really wouldn't give an opportunity to separate it well enough that some might not be offended. If the food's good enough they don't care, and that seems to be what we're experiencing here."

Quoted In:

Laventure, A., "Restaurants in Hartsville choose to be smoke-free," WMBF News, October 12, 2010.


Connie Wrin, Owner, The Verve, IN

"I was inspired by the Ballyhoo Tavern. Starting Monday, we are going non-smoking, no more smoking in The Verve. It is definitely something that I have been thinking about for quite some time, a couple of years actually. I have supported the nonsmoking ban. I was hoping it would happen sooner for the bars. I was a little hesitant to be the first one to do it, because you are always scared to take that first step, but when I saw that the Bally did it, I was like, awesome, yeah! I think it would be great if all the bars would rally around this idea and just do it. Then it would no longer be a decision of [government], it becomes a choice that we made. It is a health issue. I have been told for years from a lot of people that the reason they don't come to The Verve is because it is so smoky. Hopefully, we will start seeing some of those faces come here to listen to the music and breathe easy. The bands are at first shocked that you can still smoke in the bars here. Then their next reaction a couple hours later is, 'Oh my God, it is so smoky.' They can't believe how much smoking affects their singing. They can't sing as long that night and the next day, they still stink from the smoke. I think this will be well-appreciated by my bands that come through here."

Quoted In:

Greninger, H., "The Verve about to kick smoking status," Terre Haute Tribune-Star, September 2, 2010.


Rhyne Franklin, Manager, Penguin Drive-In, NC

"People are more comfortable bringing kids here. We thought we'd lose a lot of business because we don't have a patio, but we've actually seen more people come in."

Quoted In:

Sutherland, B., "Smoking down, business up: area restaurants and bars notice little adverse effect from N.C. smoking ban that took effect in January," Charlotte Observer, August 13, 2010.


Ben Jackson, Manager, Jackalope Jacks Restaurant & Bar, NC

"Everyone's much happier, much healthier without the secondhand smoke. "...If anything, a lot more people come out who didn't use to because it was so smoky."

Quoted In:

Sutherland, B., "Smoking down, business up: area restaurants and bars notice little adverse effect from N.C. smoking ban that took effect in January," Charlotte Observer, August 13, 2010.


Bob Miller, Owner, Brandon Steakhouse, SD

On voluntarily going smokefree: "Picked up some new business, and some old business, I used to have, but quit coming in because of the smoking. We do have a lot of families, family reunions, banquets, Easter, we were full, Brandon's a young family town, so is Luverne, we tracked business from Luverne, that we didn't have before too, because we are smoke free.”

Quoted In:

Richards, C., "Business booms at smoke free restaurant," KELOLAND.com, April 25, 2010.


Linda French, Owner, Sidetrack Bar and Grill, MI

On state's smokefree air law: "We actually welcome it. For years we were smoking and we had a small non-smoking section, but about a year ago we stopped smoking for lunch and dinner and it increased our business tremendously. I get people telling me all the time, 'Now I can come out and eat at Sidetrack.' We actually for years debated on whether to make this place non-smoking, even before all the restaurants in Ann Arbor decided to go that way. But when we did it, it was like a dream come true! I guess I should be the poster child for the non-smoking movement."

Quoted In:

Smith, A., "Local bar owners react to smoking ban," Ypsilanti Courier, January 3, 2010.


Renee Greff, Owner, Arbor Brewing Company and Corner Brewery, MI

"We thought (the state) would never get it done so we just thought it would be easier if we did it ourselves. That argument [economic losses] doesn't hold any weight whatsoever. It's a matter of public health. Employers don't get to decide whether to put their customers around poisonous or dangerous substances. It's like saying the government has no say over what temperature I can set my coolers to - of course, they absolutely have a say because it's a matter of public health. We thought that going smoke free would give us a competitive advantage. When we did go smoke free...we gained some new people. We're hoping that some of the people we lost, when this bill goes into effect, that they will want to come home. If people look at the data...it is overwhelming that it shows going smoke free always increases business."

Quoted In:

Smith, A., "Local bar owners react to smoking ban," Ypsilanti Courier, January 3, 2010.


Marc Neff, Owner, Gray's Truck Stop & Restaurant, Marysville, MO

On voluntarily going smokefree: ""It's just a business decision. We certainly don't have anything against smokers. ... We've heard it both ways, but there has definitely been a positive response.'We've had people say that they will definitely start coming out here more now. Of course there are some who say they didn't appreciate it."

Quoted In:

Brown, T., "Gray's Restaurant to snuff out smoking section on Nov. 1," Maryville Daily Forum, October 29, 2009.


Jesse Trent, Supervisor, Brothers restaurant, Broad Ripple, IN

"Hey, people like it, that's all there is to it. Even those who smoke don't mind going outside."

Quoted In:

Milz, M., "Marion County looks to expand smoking ban," WTHR, October 1, 2009.


Juilene Wuollet, Owner, Interstate Tavern in Rainier, Oregon

"...business has improved very nicely, just like I expected it would. The food trade is phenomenal. I’ve increased the clientele because (before the ban) they said they would come in and patronize me, but couldn’t stand the smoke. They'd see me on the street and apologize to me for not coming in. (Smokers) have even said we should have done it years ago."

Quoted In:

Borgaard, C.A., "Monday update: Oregon tavern owner is happy with smoking ban," The Daily News Online, June 29, 2009.


Bill Smeedy, Owner, The Cold Spot, WV

Regarding a smokefree bar ordinance: "I have not noticed any losses [in business]. I've noticed an increase in people who don't smoke starting to frequent the place."

Quoted In:

Marks, R., "One Kanawha County bar celebrates smoking ban, clean air," Charleston Gazette, April 23, 2009.


Patrick Hagen, Bar manager, Ward Two Social Club, Salem, Mass.

On the private club's decision to go smokefree: "We're trying to get the younger generation to come in. ... We have lots more rentals than we used to and more rental parties don't want smoking. ... I think, in the long run, we're going to gain more (members) than we're going to lose."

Quoted In:

Dalton, T., "Salem clubs rub out cigarettes," Salem News, March 16, 2009.


Rose Grocki, Club officer, Ward Two Social Club, Salem, Mass.

"I think it was going to happen anyway, and I think it was better we do it ourselves. I also know some people who wanted to join the club and wouldn't because of the smoking."

Quoted In:

Dalton, T., "Salem clubs rub out cigarettes," Salem News, March 16, 2009.


Tim Collins, Bar manager, Witch City VFW Post, Salem, Mass.

On going smokefree: "I took over in July, and the air quality in here was terrible. My friends would come in, and they would have one drink and leave."

Quoted In:

Dalton, T., "Salem clubs rub out cigarettes," Salem News, March 16, 2009.


Becci Trudell, General Manager, Original Pancake House, Milwaukee, WI

"The owner doesn't see a need to have a smoking area, since we don't have a bar and don't serve alcohol. We are a breakfast place, and we cater to families, and being smoke-free is more conducive to a family environment."

Quoted In:

Price, L., "Going up without smoke: these businesses are smokin' but their clients aren't, and that's by design," Journal Sentinel, December 11, 2008.


Glenn Fieber, Owner, Solly's Grille, Milwaukee, WI

"The restaurant is very small, and we took a look at how many people were actually smoking in the restaurant, and that number was dwindling. We were one of the very few that went non-smoking back then. It was a bold move at that time, but we are happy we did it."

Quoted In:

Price, L., "Going up without smoke: these businesses are smokin' but their clients aren't, and that's by design," Journal Sentinel, December 11, 2008.


Aimee Wolf, Bartender, Haute Taco, Milwaukee, WI

"I love it. I've worked in the restaurant industry for a while, and it's nice not to go home smelling like an ashtray."

Quoted In:

Price, L., "Going up without smoke: these businesses are smokin' but their clients aren't, and that's by design," Journal Sentinel, December 11, 2008.


Ted Cutting, General Manager, Stonefire Pizza, Milwaukee, WI

"Most of the time when people go out, they decide where they are going based on the environment, and we are a family friendly environment, so being smoke-free just makes families more comfortable here."

Quoted In:

Price, L., "Going up without smoke: these businesses are smokin' but their clients aren't, and that's by design," Journal Sentinel, December 11, 2008.


Eric Euteneier, General Manager, Bosley on Brady, Milwaukee, WI

"Customers love it. They've said they were sick of having to go to bars and places that were filled with stale, smoky air, and they like that they can come here to eat great food and not have to taste smoke along with it."

Quoted In:

Price, L., "Going up without smoke: these businesses are smokin' but their clients aren't, and that's by design," Journal Sentinel, December 11, 2008.


Marvin Jones, Owner, Taste of Art Coffee Bar and Cafe, Milwaukee, WI

"I hear customers talking on their phones with their friends telling them where they are and saying, 'Oh, by the way, there's no smoking here.' That's great to hear."

Quoted In:

Price, L., "Going up without smoke: these businesses are smokin' but their clients aren't, and that's by design," Journal Sentinel, December 11, 2008.


Matt Price, Manager, Captain D’s, Bedford, IN

"We’ve had more people who are happy the smoke is gone. Most smokers have stayed because they enjoy the food, and a couple of customers who are on oxygen are really pleased. Cleaning up is a lot easier. We don’t have nearly as many cigarette butts to pick up in the parking lot."

Quoted In:

Bridge, B., "Smoking 'ban' a cloudy issue," Times-Mail, November 20, 2008.


Sandi Adams, Manager, Mr. Gatti’s, Bedford, IN

"It was a great decision. The customer feedback has been positive. There were a few customers in the beginning who were a little upset about the change, but I’m still getting thanked for going smoke free. Customers tell me the dining area seems a lot cleaner without the smoke. Some customers who hadn’t been in for awhile said they would be back more often now that we went smoke free. One customer who complained in the beginning still comes in fairly regularly."

Quoted In:

Bridge, B., "Smoking 'ban' a cloudy issue," Times-Mail, November 20, 2008.


Shane Clark, General Manager, Mickey's Irish Saloon, MN

"A lot of people never would go out to a bar at all because of the smoke, but now we have customers telling us how much they enjoy our place of business."

Quoted In:

Killion Valdez, C., "Night life revives after initial smoking-ban slump," Post-Bulletin, September 26, 2008.


Dave Campbell, Music booker, Minnesota

"I was very worried at first about the negative impact it would have on business and now strongly feel that it is a very good thing."

Quoted In:

Killion Valdez, C., "Night life revives after initial smoking-ban slump," Post-Bulletin, September 26, 2008.


Rick J. Sampson, President, New York State Restaurant Association (NYSRA)

"It [smokefree law] just makes it a lot easier to manage a restaurant. What smoking does to a restaurant — the yellow ceiling, the curtains, the carpet — you had a constant cleaning factor. A lot of that has been eliminated. The first time [restaurants] went to smoking sections, there was the constant problem — the consumer who had to sit at booth 24 and the smoking section ends at booth 23. That factor has been removed. ... I've not had one phone call in all those years [since implementation] that said: 'This has put me out of business.' It's a way of life now."

Quoted In:

Daneman, M., "Bars, restaurants bounce back from state smoking ban," Democrat and Chronicle, September 6, 2008.


Ed Lump, President and CEO, Wisconsin Restaurant Association

"Restaurants with alcohol licenses and even some taverns are going totally smoke-free on their own. They aren't waiting for the legislature or their local government to act. They see the handwriting on the wall, and it's not the threat of government action that moves them to ban smoking. It's the knowledge that trying to expand business while allowing smoking flies in the face of a market where nearly 80 percent-plus of the population doesn’t smoke."

Quoted In:

Lump, E., "The smoke is clearing," Wisconsin Restaurateur: 8, July-August, 2008.


Ed Lump, President and CEO, Wisconsin Restaurant Association

"The portion of consumers who don’t smoke, don’t like smoke and don’t want their children or grandchildren exposed to smoke is growing, while the portion of consumers who smoke is declining. The marketplace is deciding this issue, and the marketplace’s decision is not to allow smoking. A situation where non-smokers have the choice of breathing smoke or leaving the building is becoming unacceptable. So is a situation where employees are exposed to second-hand smoke. Whether forced by the government or making the choice on their own, the vast majority of restaurants have had a positive experience. It appears that even a significant number of smokers support these decisions and continue to patronize their favorite restaurant or tavern."

Quoted In:

Lump, E., "The smoke is clearing," Wisconsin Restaurateur: 8, July-August, 2008.


Ed Lump, President and CEO, Wisconsin Restaurant Association

"The opportunity presented by going smoke-free is the opportunity to capture customers who don’t smoke. As has been proven time and time again by restaurants that have gone smoke-free voluntarily, non-smokers will respond by patronizing the bar. By going smoke-free on their own, they have gotten a jump on the market. Also, by acting voluntarily instead of waiting for the passage of a law, the business gets time to adjust and to see what works and what doesn’t. They get to try different promotions. They get time to advertise. Positive public relations and media support is usually available to get the word out."

Quoted In:

Lump, E., "The smoke is clearing," Wisconsin Restaurateur: 8, July-August, 2008.


Joanne Palzkill, Owner, Draganetti’s Ristorante, WI

On voluntarily going smokefree: "The overall majority of our customers were elated. We did have several regulars who were lounge customers only, not dinner patrons, who expressed dissatisfaction. They were also very heavy smokers. In both cases they have returned to be regular customers.... We expected it to be much more subtle, but it was amazingly positive. Measurement of the effect was obvious in the bottom line – sales just simply increased."

Quoted In:

Bice, S., "Successful strategies for going smoke-free, whether by choice or by law: operators find ways to make everyone welcome," Wisconsin Restaurateur: 14 , July-August, 2008.


Jenni Mills, Bartender, Buffalo Wild Wings, Iowa City, IA

"Work has become more busy since the law was initiated."

Quoted In:

Putnam, J., "Weeks after smoking ban, some businesses see surge," Daily Iowan, July 28, 2008.


Lauren Kokott, Employee, Micky's Irish Pub, Iowa City, IA

"[The smokefree law] has helped business, if nothing else."

Quoted In:

Putnam, J., "Weeks after smoking ban, some businesses see surge," Daily Iowan, July 28, 2008.


Jeff Board, General Manager of Buffalo Wild Wings Grill and Bar in Plainfield, Indiana

Regarding a smokefree ordinance: "A lot of customers and employees have responded very positively. Customers are glad they can come to the restaurant and enjoy a meal without having to worry about their clothes smelling like smoke or breathing in all of the secondhand smoke. ... It's great to be able to go someplace and not have to worry about all of the secondhand smoke. I think people in the city have come around and have been very accepting of the smoke-free workplace law."

Quoted In:

Keating, M., "WhiteLies.tv ad features Plainfield restaurant manager," Indianapolis Star, July 22, 2008.


Jeff Chilson, Owner, Mad Capper Saloon & Eatery in downtown Stillwater, MN

"I certainly haven't seen a decline in business, that's for sure. If anything, it's boosted business. The very few (smokers) that we may have lost who said, 'The heck with it, we're going across the river,' well, I think we probably gained four to five times the amount of people coming across the border this way who don't want to deal with that and would rather eat in a smoke-free environment."

Quoted In:

Wallmeyer, A., "No smoke? No problem: ,any Valley bar owners say smoking ban has helped their business," Stillwater Gazette, April 3, 2008.


Ericka Evans, Co-Manager, Bungalow Inn in Lakeland, MN

"We've actually gotten more business since the ban. It seems like it, anyway," she said. "A lot of people say they're coming back more because we're now non-smoking."

Quoted In:

Wallmeyer, A., "No smoke? No problem: ,any Valley bar owners say smoking ban has helped their business," Stillwater Gazette, April 3, 2008.


Leona Sallee, Owner, Sallee’s, Mason City, IA

"I know I've already done enough damage, and I'm just not going to breath anyone else's and breathe more damage. What we've lost in smokers we've gained with non-smokers."

Quoted In:

Benning, M., "Possible smoking ban raises eyebrows," KIMT TV, February 23, 2008.


Scott Harrell, Manager, Fatz Cafe, Aiken, Georgia

"Even two years later I get compliments. People love coming into a smoke-free environment. ... To be honest with you, I wish they'd [other restaurants] continue being smoking, cause it gives me an advantage. But they'd be a fool not to become smoke-free."

Quoted In:

Blanchard, D., "Aiken eateries say smoking ban brings in business," NBCAugusta.com, January 31, 2008.


Brad Mombert, Co-owner, Gutterballs Sports Bar, Bend, OR

"I had heard a lot of comments from people who said they don’t come to the bar because it’s smoky. We spent a lot of money on ventilators, but it never really gets the smell out of there. We tried to talk to customers beforehand and only a handful of customers were angry about it. It really hasn’t affected the business like we thought it might. Some people have come in who wouldn’t come in before because it was too smoky."

Quoted In:

Sowa, A., "As cigarettes go out, will business follow? In long run, bar owners say they don't expect to suffer," Bend Bulletin, January 28, 2008.


Scott Harrell, Operating Partner, Fatz Cafe, Aiken, SC

"It's a smart decision. The majority of the population does not smoke. I still get compliments to this day that people appreciate us being smoke free. It's been a great success."

Quoted In:

Hughes, A., "Outback Steakhouse going smoke-free for 2008," Aiken Standard, January 2, 2008.


Sean Gerrard, Owner, Outback Steakhouse, Aiken, SC

"We were only one of 14 Outback's that was still smoking. The right decision was right there in front of me. Aiken County had already moved in that direction. ... Overall it (the new rule) will be beneficial. Hands down it's going to create a healthy environment."

Quoted In:

Hughes, A., "Outback Steakhouse going smoke-free for 2008," Aiken Standard, January 2, 2008.


Kevin Laughery, Owner, Marietta Brewing Company, WV

"Yeah, I was worried, but when business didn't drop off and I felt better, by not being in here with the smoke all the time. I'd go home after work and not smell like smoke and I just feel better now. It's actually leveled off now and a lot of the people that didn't go out because of smoking, second hand smoke, or the smell of smoke on their clothes lingering, have come back out now, so we've actually had an increase in business."

Quoted In:

Rhea, A., "One year after the smoking ban," WTAP News, January 2, 2008.


Cecil Turner, Owner, Station Cafe, AR

"It's actually been a very positive thing for my business. I was actually considering going nonsmoking before the state brought the issue up, but when the government started dragging its feet I just went ahead and did it. Within a few months, the whole state went smoke-free and it just took all the weight off my shoulders. We had some complaints at first, but the way I look at it, if smokers can’t wait 20 to 30 minutes for a cigarette, then there’s something wrong. Most can. It made it so much better for those who don’t smoke. I estimate my business has actually increased by about 10 to 12 percent since the smoking ban. ... I had personally been a smoker for 50 years. I’ve since kicked the habit. I was a smoker, and I could even tell the difference within a week or two of the smoking ban. It was so much nicer in here. I felt better."

Quoted In:

Mores, J., "Smooth transition: restaurant owners, hotel managers say smoking ban is old hat now," Benton County Daily Record, December 23, 2007.


Reno Trosper, General Manager, Buffalo Wild Wings, AR

"There were some people who were annoyed at first, and we had to tell some to put out their cigarettes, but by now, it’s old hat. Everyone knows the rules, and there are no complaints. Everyone knows where to go. Business is as strong as ever. People still have to eat, especially around here, where eating out is an everyday thing for a lot of people. I do believe it’s a lot better atmosphere now that you don’t have smoke-filled rooms. I’d say everything has gone very smooth."

Quoted In:

Mores, J., "Smooth transition: restaurant owners, hotel managers say smoking ban is old hat now," Benton County Daily Record, December 23, 2007.


Louise Rients, Manager of the Ground Round, Worthington, MN

Regarding a statewide smokefree air law: "As far as our business, I could almost say we’re busier or as busy. It’s allowing people to be seated in our dining room or lounge because all is non-smoking. I really haven’t had any complaints from people. I think it was very well accepted."

Quoted In:

Buntjer, J., "Restaurant owners speak out about smoking ban," Worthington Daily Globe, November 13, 2007.


Sue Schweigert, General Manager, Perkins, Worthington, MN

Regarding a statewide smokefree air law: "Our business has increased slightly. [The business increase] was no surprise to me at all."

Quoted In:

Buntjer, J., "Restaurant owners speak out about smoking ban," Worthington Daily Globe, November 13, 2007.


Michael Reidy, Owner, Irish Rover, Too, La Grange, KY

On voluntarily going smokefree: "I think we increased our business by a lot."

Quoted In:

Uhde, A., "Oldham smoking ban 'working well'," Louisville Courier-Journal, August 21, 2007.


John Keener, Owner, Charleston Crab House, SC

John Keener, owner of the Charleston Crab House, stated that business had improved with the city's smokefree ordinance and that maintenance costs would be reduced: "It's actually worked out very well. our customers have taken it really well. they've gone outside and smoked outside. ... it's people who wouldn't normally go inside a bar that are now going to the bar because they're not smelling of smoke when they go home at night."

Quoted In:

[n.a.], "Poll: majority supports Charleston smoking ban," Live 5 News, July 26, 2007.


Jeff Broadhurst, Eat 'N Park President

"It's going well. We've seen lots of new customers in our restaurants. We've also, believe it or not, seen a lot of the smokers. I was just last week talking with a number of people in the smoking section and they said they we're still going to come here."

Quoted In:

[n.a.], "Is Eat 'N Park's smoking ban affecting business?," KDKA, June 7, 2007.


Rick Stein, Owner, Full Moon Grill, Boulder, CO

"This is a no-brainer. Everyone loves the no smoking policy for our restaurant, even the smokers who work here. Obviously the customers love it. Any state or municipality that doesn't adopt this policy is living in the dark ages. Even Italy and France are now smoke free."

Quoted In:

Stein, R., "[Email re: Colorado's smokefree air law]," Boulder, CO: Full Moon Grill, May 10, 2007.


Guillermo Casarrubias, Trattoria on Pearl, The Reef Piano Bar and Grill, Boulder, CO

"Since I moved to Colorado in 2000 from Chicago, one of the best things that happened here in the State, is to pass a legislation about making public places, restaurants and bars smoke free. Working in this environment on a daily basis, you have to think about your health, secondhand smoke it's very dangerous. Now, I love to go dancing in a club in Boulder and not to worry about the haze/smoke/smell of tobacco, or going back home and stripped down all your clothes quickly and leave them outside so the house would not get impregnated of the bad smell of tobacco, also there is more fresh air and you enjoy dancing longer to your perfect song."

Quoted In:

Casarrubias, G., "[Email re: Colorado's smokefree air law]," Boulder, CO: Guillermo Casarrubias, [May 9, 2007].


Mark Dougherty, Owner, Mark's Eastside, Appleton, WI

On the economic impact of a smokefree ordinance: "My business really didn't decrease. Some nights I've had to add bar staff. My business has been up since last year."

Quoted In:

Jones, B., "Smoking ban benefits Appleton bars, group's ads say," Green Bay Press-Gazette, April 27, 2007.


Edward Lump, President and CEO of the Wisconsin Restaurant Association

"Finally, there is the employee health issue. Evidence that prolonged exposure to second-hand smoke is harmful has really piled up in recent years. While customers can choose restaurants and even bars that are smoke free, or limit the time they spend in smoky establishments, employees are another issue. When they work in a smoky environment, they will inhale a lot of smoke over a prolonged time. Many of them are young people who think they're invincible. If this issue is about protecting workers' health, how can anyone justify protecting workers in some restaurants but not others? If you work in a restaurant that also serves alcohol, is your health somehow less important? Are people who work in taverns less worthwhile? We don't think so. The time has come to ban smoking in the workplace without exception. So let's get on with it!"

Quoted In:

Lump, E., "LTE: Edward Lump," Chetek Alert, April 4, 2007.


Amy Kurland, Owner of the Bluebird Café in Green Hills, TN

On voluntarily going smokefree: "It was one of the best business decisions I ever made."

Quoted In:

Rodgers, J., "Restaurant owners say smoking bans helped business and improved health," City Paper, April 4, 2007.


Clark Shaw, Owner of the Old Country Store in Jackson, TN

On voluntarily going smokefree: "The reaction from our guests has been extremely positive. And the negative reaction has been almost nonexistent."

Quoted In:

Rodgers, J., "Restaurant owners say smoking bans helped business and improved health," City Paper, April 4, 2007.


Buck Clark, Owner of two smokefree bars in Waterloo, IA

"Me, personally, I think the whole state should be nonsmoking. For people who say they're going to lose business, they're absolutely wrong."

Quoted In:

Dorman, T., "'Local control' bill gaining momentum as statewide smoking ban smolders," Waterloo-Cedar Falls Courier, March 4, 2007.


Matthew Salyer, Manager, Tolly-Ho, Lexington, KY

"The smoking ban made the atmosphere much nicer and much cleaner. We're more family- and student-friendly now."

Quoted In:

Saltz, K., "Bars, study agree: business good despite smoke ban," Kentucky Kernel, February 21, 2007.


Terry Fisher, Manager, Lynagh's Irish Pub and Grill, Lexington, KY

"Business isn't as bad as everyone expected it to be. Actually, it's gone fairly well. Bars around here have had to learn how to adjust."

Quoted In:

Saltz, K., "Bars, study agree: business good despite smoke ban," Kentucky Kernel, February 21, 2007.


Stephanie Misemer, Assistant Manager of the Millstone at Baken Park, SD

"It hasn't hurt our business at all, I can say that. If anything, we've been busier. ... We always had a waiting list for people waiting for the nonsmoking area."

Quoted In:

Bell Gease, H., "Bar patrons debate effort to snuff out smoking," Rapid City Journal, February 6, 2007.


Randy Rayburn, Midtown Café, Nashville, TN

On a 15 percent increase in business following a voluntary smokefree policy: "Our customers are accustomed to … this everywhere else in the country where they travel. Tennessee is becoming the exception to the rule."

Quoted In:

Fender, J., "Smoking ban has chance: restaurants in Nashville lower resistance to legislation," Tennessean, January 26, 2007.


Joaquin Varagoza, Manager, Las Palmas, Nashville, TN

On the possibility of a statewide smokefree air law: "To have no problem with the customers, it would be better to have the state make the decision. Then everybody is going to understand it's the law. We'd be happy."

Quoted In:

Fender, J., "Smoking ban has chance: restaurants in Nashville lower resistance to legislation," Tennessean, January 26, 2007.


Karen Long, Deluxe Bar & Grill, WA

Regarding a statewide smokefree air law: "Business is better. It has brought in more people and families. It definitely has not hurt business one bit."

Quoted In:

Brueckmann, K., "About that smoking ban...," Capitol Hill Times, January 25, 2007.


Massey Hejazi, Food Director, Renaissance Pittsburgh Hotel, PA

On voluntarily going smokefree: "Not only has it not hurt, it has increased our food sales. The lounge was one of our concerns. But I have actually people who eat there now who didn't before because of the smoke. We've received an excellent response."

Quoted In:

Pfister, B., "Restaurant smokeout boosting food sales," Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, January 2, 2007.


Tim Zagat, CEO, Zagat Survey

"It is clear from our surveys that the vast majority of Americans prefer their restaurants, bars and clubs to be smoke-free."

Quoted In:

[n.a.], "2007 America's Top Restaurants Survey shows U.S. diners overwhelmingly favor smoke-free restaurants and bars," Smoke-Free Environments Law Project, November 8, 2006.


Don Carlyle, Owner, Carlyle Brewing, Rockford, IL

Regarding the economic impact of voluntarily going smokefree: "Its grown. We're still putting numbers together, but we're looking at an average of probably forty-five percent since we went smoke free."

Quoted In:

Lindner, M., "Area bars go smoke free," WIFR 23, August 28, 2006.


James Terhark, Owner, Habaneros, Rockford, IL

Regarding the economic impact of voluntarily going smokefree: "There's a lot of people who wouldn't go out because the places were just full of smoke. Now that there's an option, a place where they can go out that's non-smoking, you're getting that business that never went out before."

Quoted In:

Lindner, M., "Area bars go smoke free," WIFR 23, August 28, 2006.


Rodney Utz, Owner, Rodney's, Denver, CO

On the impact of a statewide smokefree law on his business: "I'm up 100 percent for the same week last year. Friday night was the biggest Friday night we've ever had."

Quoted In:

Husted, B., "Former smokers' den has 'biggest Friday night ever'," Denver Post, July 13, 2006.


Tim Alford, Manager, Pitt Grill, LA

"It increased our business anywhere from 75 to 85 percent because we have a lot of people that don't smoke in the community that prefer a non smoking restaurant."

Quoted In:

Dixon, P., "Local business benefits from smoking ban," 7KPLC, July 7, 2006.


Marc Buehler, Vice president of marketing for Romacorp Inc., operator of the Tony Roma's chain

"The impact on our business has been minimal. Even in markets like Las Vegas, we did not see a falloff because of that decision."

Quoted In:

Robinson-Jacobs, K., "Report: no amount of smoke is safe," Report: no amount of smoke is safe, June 28, 2006.


Jeff Landau, Restaurateur, Atlanta, GA

Landau stated his business increased after a smokefree law took effect: "By and large, the overwhelming majority of our customers like the change in the law."

Quoted In:

Costello, T., "Are smoking bans helping restaurants, bars? New York City tax receipts, employment rise after 2002 ban," MSNBC Nightly News, June 27, 2006.


Bruce Smith, General Manager, Newport News Marriott at City Center, VA

"Properties world-wide, from intimate bed and breakfasts to major international hotel brands are going smoke-free because it makes good sense. With today's emphasis on wellness and healthy lifestyles, we want to make sure our hotel provides a fresh, healthy environment for our guests and associates."

Quoted In:

Newport News Marriott at City Center, "Take a deep breath in ... out. Again. There's something din the air at New Virginia Marriott," PRNewswire, June 12, 2006.


Penny Gallop, Owner, Pots on ’N’ Kitchen, Powells Point, NC

"We changed to a no smoking policy in 2002 and it never hurt our business."

Quoted In:

[n.a.], "Pots on ’N’ Kitchen goes smoke-free," Outer Banks Sentinel, May 30, 2006.


Trina Gallop, Manager, Pots on ’N’ Kitchen, Powells Point, NC

"We tried to create smoking and no smoking sections; however, it is impossible to keep secondhand smoke out of the no smoking section so we decided that smoke free dining was in the best interests of our staff and our patrons."

Quoted In:

[n.a.], "Pots on ’N’ Kitchen goes smoke-free," Outer Banks Sentinel, May 30, 2006.


Kent Esra, Owner, Cobblestone Grill, Zionsville, IN

On voluntarily going smokefree: "We've had some people who've had bad experiences because of the smoke. We felt now was the time (to ban smoking). Of course, some regulars who smoke aren't excited and may go elsewhere, but they understand what we're trying to do. We haven't changed the service or the quality of food, we're just literally changing the atmosphere." Esra added that within the first 24 hours of going smokefree, he had received ten to fifteen emails from grateful customers. Esra supports a local smokefree ordinance.

Quoted In:

Annis, R., "Smoking-ban idea smoldering in Zionsville: draft ordinance could be introduced this summer," Topics.com, May 16, 2006.


Justin Novak, Banquet Manager, Northern Lights Restaurant and Franklin Square Tap, MI

On voluntarily going smokefree: "Nonsmokers love it, obviously. They have a place where they can come hang out, and they don’t have to breathe second hand smoke."

Quoted In:

Kirby, L., "Group clears the smoke on policy: lighting up in local bars and restaurants studied," Daily Mining Gazette, May 4, 2006.



Sam Helmi, Owner, Oakcrest Family Restaurant, Greensboro, NC

On voluntarily going smokefree: "I may have lost five customers but I may have gained 150. We see more kids now, because any parent, they don't want their kid to be around smoke anyway." Helmi said business is up 15 percent.

Quoted In:

[n.a.], "To smoke or not to smoke," WFMY 2 News, April 15, 2006.


Greg Welsh, Owner, Chestnut Grill & Sidewalk Cafe and the Ogontz Grill & Sidewalk Cafe, Philadelphia, PA

On voluntarily going smokefree: "I went through the Zagat guide for New York City restaurants. I called seven or eight, and I said, 'What's happened to you guys [since New York banned smoking]? Everyone said they're tickled with the change. We were afraid we'd lose business and we did lose business -- we lost a couple of veteran smokers. But we've more than made up for it with new diners. Our bar is now being used by diners."


Quoted In:

Van Allen, P., "Tasco takes stab at putting out the fire: councilwoman thinks now the time is right for city smoking ban bill," Philadelphia Business Journal, April 14, 2006.


Jim Rich, President of the Greater Beaumont (TX) Chamber of Commerce

"A number of cities in Texas have enacted this ordinance; It has not impacted business. We want Beaumont to be at the forefront, not the last community to respond to what has become a significant public heath issue."

Quoted In:

[n.a.], "Beaumont Chamber of Commerce supports smoking ban," KBTV NBC 4, March 20, 2006.


Gardner Perry, Lead singer, Mama Kicks

"When I wake up the next morning with a heavy throat, scratchy eyes, I wonder if my job is killing me."

Quoted In:

[n.a.], "Restaurant workers speak out in favor of smoking ban," TheChamplainChannel.com, March 21, 2006.


Kristen Cote, Bartender, Red Blazer, NH

"Most can't smoke at their jobs. This is where I choose to work. They come and they put me in danger."

Quoted In:

[n.a.], "Restaurant workers speak out in favor of smoking ban," TheChamplainChannel.com, March 21, 2006.


Tim Scanlon, Owner, The Sunset Grill, NH

"For every trade, there are laws protecting workers. There should be in the restaurant industry, also."

Quoted In:

[n.a.], "Restaurant workers speak out in favor of smoking ban," TheChamplainChannel.com, March 21, 2006.


Barbara Cage and Margaret Moorefield, Owners, Bistro 1888, VA

"If one chooses to smoke, that is one's prerogative. If one chooses to smoke and that smoke affects another's health, the challenge begins. According to The National Cancer Institute, secondhand smoke contains more than 4,000 chemicals; 66 are either carcinogenic or interfere with normal cell development. At least 40,000 nonsmoking Americans die from second-hand smoke each year. Many more contract cancer, heart disease, atherosclerosis, asthma, and chronic respiratory infections. In a restaurant, smoke can be an irritant to some, exacerbate respiratory problems for others, decrease the ability to fully taste food, or eliminate one's appetite altogether. The majority of our guests do not smoke. If smoke is a problem, it can ruin the overall 'dining experience' that we are trying to create. This year, our business has increased, and the amount of smoke also has increased--but the biggest increase has been in the requests for the restaurant to be smoke-free. As we do not have a separate room for smoking, we feel we need to do what is right for the health and enjoyment of our guests and our employees. As we begin our fourth year in South Boston, we will be a smoke-free restaurant as of March 10."

Quoted In:

Cage, B. Moorefield, M., "Smoking ban killed, but smokers could be slowly killing you," Free Lance-Star, March 9, 2006.


Robin Comstock, Greater Manchester Chamber of Commerce, NH

"We believe this bill will not adversely impact the business community."

Quoted In:

[n.a.], "House prepares for vote on smoking ban," TheWMURChannel.com, March 8, 2006.


Shawn Joyce, President of Margarita's Restaurants, NH

"At first we were opposed, but later we found it had no effect on revenue." Joyce said the ban is supported by 75 percent of owners because it cuts down on cleaning and improves employee health. "The fact is, employees don't always have a choice where they work," Joyce said.

Quoted In:

[n.a.], "House prepares for vote on smoking ban," TheWMURChannel.com, March 8, 2006.


Dick Barrows, Owner, Starfish Brasserie, PA

On deciding to go smokefree: ''Many people have told us that they love our bar, but they can't stand the smoke."

Quoted In:

Radzievich, N., "Bethlehem eatery latest to ban smoking," Morning Call, February 14, 2006.


Paul Mazurowski, Vice president of food and beverage, Reno Hilton, NV

On the decision to make six of the hotel's restaurants smokefree: "We're listening to our customers and responding to what they want with this change."

Quoted In:

Wright, J.L., "Six Reno Hilton restaurants go smokefree," RGJ.com, February 8, 2006.


Tony Ciriello, Manager, Luigi's, Akron, OH

Ciriello decided to take the restaurant smokefree, when he noticed nonsmokers were waiting in long lines for tables to open up, while tables in the smoking section were empty. Ciriello stated, "Majority rules -- and this is the vast majority. It's not fair to people who are standing in a line 10 tables back. I think by us putting this in place, that other restaurants are not going to be afraid to do it -- I hope. I mean, I'm not trying to start anything. We're doing this mainly for the customers. It's too late for me. So now I can just look at the little bambinos coming in (and know they're safe); it's them I'm concerned for."

Quoted In:

Klepach, S.M., "Luigi's snuffs smoking: manager cites long lines of patrons who spurn open tables in smoking area," Akron Beacon Journal, February 4, 2006.


Maureen Leavitt, Bartender, Michael's All-star Tavern, WA

Regarding a statewide smokefree bar law: "We were pretty nervous, wondering if we were going to lose a lot of business. I don't believe we've seen a dramatic change. I'd say it's pretty much the same."

Quoted In:

[n.a.], "Smoking ban's affect on bars," KNDO, December 12, 2005.


Veronica Eliason-Nye, American Pubs Inc., New York, NY

"Mostly what people say is that it’s more comfortable for them — smokers and nonsmokers alike. Initially there were a lot of very
outspoken people. But you just don’t hear about it much anymore."

Quoted In:

Doyle, G. Wischnowsky, D., "Smoking bans not hurting hospitality, cities report: Lincoln businesspeople still have complaints," Chicago Tribune, December 8, 2005.


Dan Rosenthal, Owner of Trattoria No. 10 in Chicago, IL and spokesman for Chefs and Owners United for Good Health, a group of 120 restaurants that support a comprehensive smokefree ordinance

Regarding difficulties in getting a smokefree ordinance passed: "It's Chicago politics at its finest. It's clout over caring. Personal benefit over personal health. It's absolute insanity. Every major city in the country should be laughing at the process we're going through."

Quoted In:

Carberry, M., "Dragging ash," Chicago Tribune, December 6, 2005.


Al Fleenor, President and CEO, Pacific Coast Restaurants Inc., Portland, OR

"We take our guests' comments very seriously. We require our managers to solicit feedback from diners about their experience. We also distribute comment cards for guests to fill out. With both voice and pen, guests have strongly requested that we eliminate smoking in our lounges."

Quoted In:

[n.a.], "Pacific Coast Restaurants becoming smoke-free," Portland Business Journal, December 2, 2005.


Glenn Keefer, Owner, Keefer's, Chicago, IL

Regarding a proposed smokefree ordinance: "People aren't going to stay home. People don't go out to smoke and drink, they go out to mix and meet with other people. They go out to have good food, they go out to watch a ball game on TV with other people."

Quoted In:

Burghart, T., "Several Illinois towns consider anti-smoking proposals tougher than statewide law," Associated Press, December 1, 2005.


Larry Levy, Chairman of Levy Restaurants and a member of Chefs and Owners United for Good Health, Chicago, IL

"It's embarrassing that in 2005 we have to debate this issue. We are the largest independent restaurant company headquartered in Chicago, and we are here to say we want a 100 percent smoke-free environment."

Quoted In:

Washburn, G. Alexander, D., "2 sides to talk out smoking ban: city officials discuss compromise plan," Chicago Tribune, November 28, 2005.


Norm Allee, Owner, The Lunch Box Cafe, Lebanon, MO

"I wasn’t pressured into it by anybody but my own health.…I’ve set a goal for myself that I’m going to retire in about five years. I am a heart patient, and I wanted my last five years to be smoke free."

Quoted In:

Decker, M., "Downtown cafe voluntarily kicking the habit: Lunch Box to be smoke-free facility as of Nov. 25," Lebanon Daily Record, November 20, 2005.


Terry Smith, President and CEO of Tumbleweed, with five restaurants in Louisville, KY

"Even if we were to meet it [requirement for being exempt from a smokefree ordinance], we would still go smoke-free. We believe in the mayor's initiative for smoke-free environment for employees, as well as our guests."

Quoted In:

Gerth, J., "Many claim smoking ban exemptions: Louisville businesses, groups prepare for new rules Tuesday," Louisville Courier-Journal, November 13, 2005.


John Ingall, Bar manager at American Legion Post. No. 26 in White River Junction, VT

"Some people are very upset with it and think their rights are being taken away. My personal feeling is, I think it will help business (by attracting) people who don't come in because of the smoke. It will make the place smell better."

Quoted In:

Gregg, J.P., "VA Hospital last refuge for smoking in public: officials say the facility's exempt as federal property," Concord Monitor, September 11, 2005.


Jar Arcand, Owner, Santiago's, Yakima, WA

"People have become accustomed to smoke-free restaurants."

Quoted In:

Huang, A., "The debate over Initiative 901," Yakima Herald, November 1, 2005.



Bob Hargreaves, Owner, Bob's Keg and Cork, Yakima, WA

"For every one (customer) I lose because it is smoke-free, I gain 10 more."

Quoted In:

Huang, A., "The debate over Initiative 901," Yakima Herald, November 1, 2005.



Kari Bliesner, Co-Owner, Snipes Mountain Brewery, Yakima, WA

"I think people appreciate that they don't have to have all the smoke while they are enjoying their meals."

Quoted In:

Huang, A., "The debate over Initiative 901," Yakima Herald, November 1, 2005.



Ned Walsh, Owner, 901 Pasta, Yakima, WA

"Smoking and food just don't go together."

Quoted In:

Huang, A., "The debate over Initiative 901," Yakima Herald, November 1, 2005.


Dan Meyer, Restaurateur and President of the Union Square Hospitality Group

"Every single fear that was injected into this argument in New York has not only not come to pass, but it's been quite the opposite. Restaurants are busier than ever. Bars are busier than ever."

Quoted In:

Burton, C., "Smoke free city: how did ban affect NY?," ABC7 Chicago, October 25, 2005.


Chuck Hunt, New York State Restaurant Association

"There are probably still some hardcore smokers that aren't coming to restaurants, but there are also people coming to restaurants that wouldn't go there before, because they didn't want to be around the smoking."

Quoted In:

Burton, C., "Smoke free city: how did ban affect NY?," ABC7 Chicago, October 25, 2005.


Michael Steele, Markt Restaurant Association GM

"I think we were a little slower than usual for about two days, and then after that, we've seen really no negative results from the ban whatsoever."

Quoted In:

Burton, C., "Smoke free city: how did ban affect NY?," ABC7 Chicago, October 25, 2005.


Ed Berube, Owner, Club Soda

Regarding a statewide smokefree air law: "I think it’s been good for business. It’s gone wonderfully well."

Quoted In:

Jack, P., "Smoking ban clears the air," Block Island Times, October 15, 2005.


Cannon Ross, Bartender, Barkley's, Frisco, CO

Regarding the impact of a countywide smokefree bar and restaurant ordinance: "I'm a smoker and I love it. I can breathe better, my eyes don't burn, and I smell better. It's a much cleaner environment. If anything, we've gained business. Non-smokers stay longer because it's not smoky, and the smokers are willing to go outside."

Quoted In:

Miller, S.N., "Summit settles into life with smoking ban," Vail Daily, October 22, 2005.


Jimmy Jacox, Bartender, Moose Jaw, Frisco, CO

Regarding the impact of a countywide smokefree bar and restaurant ordinance: "People come in with their families to eat, and they don't want to be around a bunch of smoke. At first it took a while for people to get used to it, but that didn't take long."

Quoted In:

Miller, S.N., "Summit settles into life with smoking ban," Vail Daily, October 22, 2005.


Danny Young, Owner of a Glasgow, KY, restaurant

"I just started keeping count one night and I seated 175 people and 2 of them were smokers...so that made the decision a whole lot easier."

Quoted In:

Evans, T., "Glasgow restaurant goes smokefree," WBKO 13, October 3, 2005.


Paul Rudd, Manager, Sean Kelly's Pub, Missoula, MT

"It's been great for us, we've seen growth with our food sales, a lot of customer compliments, lots of positive feedback from the customers."

Quoted In:

[n.a.], "Cracking down on lighting up," KPAX, September 29, 2005.


Jethro Scotcher-Littlechild, Barowner, Cambridge, England

On voluntarily going smokefree: "Even customers who smoke don't like smoke in the air and they have said they will be happy to go outside."

Quoted In:

[n.a.], "Fourth pub to join smoke-free ranks," Cambridge Evening News, September 30, 2005.


Don Arena, Owner, Red Fox Steakhouse and Lounge, Lincoln, NE

Regarding a smokefree ordinance: "I was so scared that my business was going to be hurt. It’s done wonders for my business. I can come to work and breathe normally."

Quoted In:

Laukaitas, A.J., "Survey: Lincolnites support smoking ban," Lincoln Journal Star, September 20, 2005.


Andy Wagner, Owner, Kuhn's Deli, Deerfield, IL

On going smokefree several years ago: "I have not lost any business."

Quoted In:

Morand, J. Solomon, R., "Deerfield woman pushes for smoking ban," Deerfield Review, September 1, 2005.


J.R. Roof, Manager of the Other Side, Missoula, MT

"The response has been overwhelmingly positive, even amongst smokers. June, for our type of business, is a slow month; but I fully expect that we will see positive changes in revenue from (going smoke-free), given the reaction we've seen so far."

Quoted In:

Nickell, J., "Nickell's Bag: smoke signals ahead — will Sean Kelly be the Irishman who broke Camel's pack?," Missoulian, [2005].


Elizabeth Martinez, Owner, Trin-B'ago Caribbean Restaurant, Durham, NC

"When I first decided to open, it was not a question of doubt whether we would be smoke-free. It has not affected in any way the business or the amount of patrons we get."

Quoted In:

Gronberg, R., "Smoke-free dining push starts," Herald-Sun, August 23, 2005.


Francesca Mills, Owner, Francesca's Dessert Caffe , Durham, NC

"Smoking and food don't really go together. Neither does smoking and desserts."

Quoted In:

Gronberg, R., "Smoke-free dining push starts," Herald-Sun, August 23, 2005.


Heather Wisneski, Supervisor, Max & Erma's, Westerville, OH

On the economic impact of a smokefree restaurant ordinance: "Really, there's not been a whole lot of reaction."

Quoted In:

Major, M., "Smoking ban goes in effect with nary a puff of a problem," Suburban News Publications, August 18, 2005.


Paul Ishii, General Manager, Oliver's Bar, in Seattle, Washington's Mayflower Park Hotel

"There were a few negative reactions, but they were outweighed by the many other folks who said, 'It's about time.'"

Quoted In:

Tice, C., "More restaurants and bars adopting nonsmoking policies," Puget Sound Business Journal, August 12, 2005.


Chris Morales, Assistant Manager, Von's Grand City Cafe, Seattle, WA

"People had been going off on us for months that this was going to ruin our business. This is it. Nail in the coffin. But if anything, our business has increased."

Quoted In:

Tice, C., "More restaurants and bars adopting nonsmoking policies," Puget Sound Business Journal, August 12, 2005.


Jack Raines, Owner, Chelan Lanes, WA

On making his bowling alley and restaurant smokefree: "The results have been very positive. Our business has actually increased."

Quoted In:

Tice, C., "More restaurants and bars adopting nonsmoking policies," Puget Sound Business Journal, August 12, 2005.


Jack Raines, Owner, Chelan Lanes, WA

On making his bowling alley and restaurant smokefree: "The results have been very positive. Our business has actually increased."

Quoted In:

Tice, C., "More restaurants and bars adopting nonsmoking policies," Puget Sound Business Journal, August 12, 2005.


Laura Gadbow, Manager, Tides Tavern, Gig Harbor, WA

Gadbow, concerned about secondhand smoke, convinced the owners to go smokefree and noted that lunch and dinner business has tripled and, "We've had so many people come in and compliment us for going nonsmoking."

Quoted In:

Tice, C., "More restaurants and bars adopting nonsmoking policies," Puget Sound Business Journal, August 12, 2005.


Gregg Dedrick and Peter Hearl, Presidents of KFC and Pizza Hut respectively

On the decision to make all company-owned Pizza Hut and KFC restaurants smokefree: "This is a critical issue. In our opinion, going smoke-free is simply the right thing to do."

Quoted In:

Noon, C., "Faces in the news: Novak's Yum! restaurants to go smoke free," Forbes, August 12, 2005.


Jason Bingham, Kitchen Manager, Bogey's Neighborhood Grill, Cherokee County, GA

Since a statewide smokefree air law took effect, "Our food sales are higher than they've ever been."

Quoted In:

Williams, C., "Business is booming despite smoking ban," Atlanta Journal-Constitution, August 4, 2005.


Jeff Badders, Shift Leader, Ruby Tuesday's, Lafayette, IN

Badders noted that business at the restaurant has increased since it went smokefree in October 2004 and said, "Now it's completely clean. It's wonderful."

Quoted In:

Stutsman, B. Slyder, C., "Smoking bans still simmering," Lafayette Journal and Courier, August 4, 2005.


Debbie Proudfoot, Owner of Debbie's Homestyle Kitchen, Fergus Falls, MN

"I get more thank yous and people that are happy with the decision than those who aren't."

Quoted In:

Horner, S., "Debbie's snuffs all smoking," Daily Journal, August 3, 2005.


Bert Bertolo, Manager of Barley’s Brewing, Columbus, OH

"I think it has been a positive, without a question. It hasn’t affected the bottom line. I think our sales are at or above last year’s sales, and that is something to be proud of since we lost hockey."

Quoted In:

Andes, J., "Effect of smoking ban on bars mild so far," Columbus Dispatch, August 1, 2005.


Stephanie Ertzberger, Waitress, Ronnie's, GA

"We've only had one person complain. Other than that it's been really great."

Quoted In:

[n.a.], "Smoking ban a boon to local restaurant," WTOC 11, July 15, 2005.


Dorothy Reeck, Owner, Roanoke Inn Tavern, Mercer Island, WA

Reeck stated that preserving the building in which her business is located was a major reason for going smokefree, and that, "We didn't do an actual poll, but we did think about this a lot and ask a lot of people for input. The majority of people we serve are non-smokers and they don't like a smoke-filled room and second-hand smoke. If people really want to smoke, there will be places they can go outside. I was kind of hoping the state would go smoke-free, several states have already, and look at what they've accomplished in Ireland. They've pretty much shown the world. If they can go smoke-free in Ireland, we can surely do it here."

Quoted In:

Longoria, R., "Don't smoke at the `Noke: tavern joins other smoke-free restaurants," Mercer Island Reporter, July 7, 2005.


Ken Caldwell, Manager, Islander Restaurant, Mercer Island, WA

Regarding the decision of his competitor, the Roanoke Inn Tavern to go smokefree: "Many of our customers are young families and they prefer to be away from the smoke. I've heard several customers say that they really like the Roanoke and would go there more often, but the smoking is the only deterrent. That always worked in our favor."

Quoted In:

Longoria, R., "Don't smoke at the `Noke: tavern joins other smoke-free restaurants," Mercer Island Reporter, July 7, 2005.


John Ingle, Leader, Elks Lodge in Port Orange, FL

"At one point, people were adamant, dead set against the law. No one bucks it now. We were caught one time, and that's it. Membership is booming. Nonsmoking people are coming in and joining. It's surprised me."

Quoted In:

Saunders, J. Weiss, R., "State ban on smoking still evokes emotions," Daytona Beach News-Journal, July 3, 2005.


Jeff Webb, Owner of Jefferson’s, Lawrence, KS

On the impact of a smokefree ordinance: "We’re getting a lot more families with children. For every one person who complains about it to me, I have nine who say that they love it."

Quoted In:

[n.a.], "Supporters, opponents calculate first year’s cost of smoking ban," Lawrence Journal-World, July 1, 2005.


Melinda Speir, Owner, Trojan Grill in Chickamauga, GA

"I’ve never allowed smoking here and it hasn’t ever affected my business."

Quoted In:

Carlfeldt, T., "Breathin’ easy: local businesses say smoking ban won’t hurt their bottom line," Walker County Messenger, June 29, 2005.


Sean Newell, General Manager, Angell's Bar and Grill, Boise, ID

Regarding the impact of a smokefree law: "A large percentage of people love the fact we are completely no smoking inside. And while a group of people were not at all pleased they had to go outside to smoke, they're used to it now."

Quoted In:

Wylde, L., "Snuffed out: Boise restaurants say smoking ban inequitable but rarely damaging to business," Boise Weekly, June 29, 2005.


Jim Parkinson, Owner, Piper Pub and Grill, Boise, ID

Regarding the impact of a smokefree law: "People aren't congregating in places like they used to, and the smoke kept out families. Those people are coming out of the woodwork in mass, and now that the smoke barrier is gone, that market is available to us, when it wasn't before."

Quoted In:

Wylde, L., "Snuffed out: Boise restaurants say smoking ban inequitable but rarely damaging to business," Boise Weekly, June 29, 2005.


Mary Merritt, Owner, Merritt's Country Cafe, Boise, ID

"We haven't lost any customers because we had to go smoke-free. We couldn't have gone smoke-free on our own. It definitely would have hurt us if we had done it on our own. We would have made a lot of customers mad."

Quoted In:

Wylde, L., "Snuffed out: Boise restaurants say smoking ban inequitable but rarely damaging to business," Boise Weekly, June 29, 2005.


Dave Fellows, Owner, Jim's Cafe, Boise, ID

"I'm very glad the state enacted this law. I would have liked to put in a smoking ban, but I didn't know how that would have affected business. It's a tough call, which decision to make; if we changed our smoking policy, I'm sure we would have upset people."

Quoted In:

Wylde, L., "Snuffed out: Boise restaurants say smoking ban inequitable but rarely damaging to business," Boise Weekly, June 29, 2005.


John Schmitt, Co-Owner, Ned Kelly's Steak House, Peoria, IL

On why his restaurant is going smokefree: "At my last appointment, my doctor asked me if I had been smoking a lot. I said that no, I hadn't, but I had worked in the restaurant industry for 35 years. He said, 'Well second-hand smoke is the next best thing to smoking.' For my customers' sake, my employees' sake, and my own sake, I knew it was time to take the plunge. We told our regular smokers that it was nothing personal against them, but we thought it was in everybody's best interest. Employees enjoy the non-smoking atmosphere, most customers do, and I definitely do."

For other restaurateurs trying to reach a decision on the issue, Schmitt stated, "You could, possibly, lose business at first, although Ned Kelly's really hasn't. But in the long run, you'll gain it back and then some."

Quoted in: Murphy, E., "Restaurants quitting cold turkey: Tri-County area is seeing more and more eateries opting to go smoke free all the time," Peoria Journal Star, June 24, 2005


Piper Anderson, Spokeswoman, Morton's Steakhouse

Morton's has 68 restaurants across the county, including 24 in smoke-free jurisdictions. The company has "not seen any decline in business" in those locations.

Quoted In:

Weiss, E.M., "Hazy views are rare in debate over smoking ban," Washington Post: C01, June 19, 2005.


Dennis Theoharis, Executive Director of the Montgomery County, Maryland, Board of Liquor License Commissioners

Theoharis said the number of places licensed to sell alcohol for on-premises consumption increased from 659 at the time of the smokefree ordinance in October 2003 to 698 in January 2005. "Those are the hard facts. You can't hide that. That is what it is. I don't see any decrease. I've had some licensees call me and say their business was down after the ban, but they have yet to close their doors."

Quoted In:

Weiss, E.M., "Hazy views are rare in debate over smoking ban," Washington Post: C01, June 19, 2005.


David Parker, Manager, Highlands Bar & Grill, Birmingham, AL

"I can't say it has really had any kind of negative impact. Fortunately, we've been doing a good job of staying busy."


Quoted In:

Norris, T., "Restaurants: smoking ban not hurting their business," Birmingham News, June 16, 2005.


Jeff Davies, Co-Owner, Moose Bar, Lander, WY

"It was a little hard to decide to do it, but actually I think it's worked. We just had a gut feeling that things will be better off and patrons will like it. You actually gain customers. I think they'll change the law sooner or later in Wyoming."

Quoted In:

Nordby, B., "Smoke-free by choice," Casper Star-Tribune, June 13, 2005.


Suzanne Marino, Co-Owner, Cadillac Grille, Jackson, WY

On a decision to go smokefree in the near future, Marino stated that there had been "extreme demand" from customers and employees. "They're irate that we have not stopped."

Quoted In:

Nordby, B., "Smoke-free by choice," Casper Star-Tribune, June 13, 2005.


John Davis, Co-Owner, Franklin Square Tap, Houghton, MI

On deciding to make his bar smokefree after a stay in the hospital: "All of a sudden, you become more conscious of other people. That's what got me thinking about having a place that's smoke-free - both for employees and the customers that are bothered by it."

Quoted In:

Marshall, K., "Going smoke-free," Daily Mining Gazette, June 9, 2005.


Greg Davis, Co-Owner, Franklin Square Tap, Houghton, MI

On deciding to make his bar smokefree, despite being a smoker himself: "A lot of people have complimented me on it and are very happy we did it. They don't go home smelling like a cigarette. It's better for them overall; they're breathing clean air. My personal taste can take a back seat."

Quoted In:

Marshall, K., "Going smoke-free," Daily Mining Gazette, June 9, 2005.


Terry Chester, Owner, TC's Lounge, Gainesville, FL

"Finally, people who like to dance but hate cigarette smoke will be able to have fun on a Friday night."

Quoted In:

Sirmons, J., "Smoke-free jazz club opens Friday," Gainesville Sun, June 7, 2005.


James "J.R." Roof, Booking Manager, Otherside, Missoula, MT

On going smokefree in the nightclub: "The numbers and the economics are undeniable. When the demographics are such that 70 percent of people don't smoke, it's a no-brainer as far as I'm concerned. There are so many non-smokers who have told me they don't come to shows here because of the smoke. I think we'll be able to retain the smokers, and we'll gain a lot of non-smokers. Also, it's getting to where a lot of the bands are so appreciative of playing in a smoke-free environment. They're tired of playing in smoky bars."

Quoted In:

Nickell, J., "Otherside goes smoke-free," The Missoulian, June 1, 2005.


Ron Piper, Owner, Simply Sage Bar

Piper stated that "health reasons" were behind his decision to make his bar smokefree: "You can always get more money, but you can’t buy health. We are figuring that we are going to have an increase in [sales]. We’ve had quite a few complaints about the smoking [in the bar]. We think we’ll come out ahead. I think this will make a big difference. All bars are going to go smoke free eventually. Somebody’s got to be the first in line."

Quoted In:

Madrid, M., "Simply Sage Bar first to go smoke-free in Evanston," Uinta County Herald, May 31, 2005.


Frederick Heller, Owner, Frederick's and The Loft, Fredericksburg, VA

On why he made his restaurant and nightclub smokefree: "So many people these days don't go to nightclubs on a regular basis because of the smoking."

Quoted In:

Cotter, M., "the butt STOPS here Some eateries ban smoking," Free Lance-Star, June 2, 2005.


Harry Yiasemides, Owner, The 2400 Diner, Fredericksburg, VA

On going smokefree: "It brought me more [customers]. I lost some, but I got a lot more."

Quoted In:

Cotter, M., "the butt STOPS here Some eateries ban smoking," Free Lance-Star, June 2, 2005.


Kimberly Wyke, Manager, Pizza Inn, Greensboro, NC

After going smokefree, Wyke said revenues increased 11%: "Sales have definitely gone up. And 9 out of 10 people who comment about it are supportive of the change."

Quoted In:

[n.a.], "Some restaurants going smoke free even without state law," WFMY News, May 26, 2005.


Tim Smeehuyzen, Owner, Smee’s Place, Indianapolis, IN

"Business immediately went up. Our first month was about ten percent higher than normal and it was directly related to the non-smoking. It's good for customers, it's good for employees -- even the ones who smoke -- they end up smoking less."

Quoted In:

McDermott, M., "Marion County smoking ban passes with bipartisan vote," WISH-TV, May 24, 2005.


Te Soa, Owner, Hunan Village, Carbondale, IL

"When we first did it about one to two percent of the customers complained, but now we don't get any comments about it. Most people like it, a few don't. My employees tell me they don't smell like smoke when they get off their shift. When we allowed smoking, we would have to clean the filters every three months. They would be black. Now we do it once, maybe twice a year."

Quoted In:

Sack, N., "City rewards smoke-free establishments," Southern Illinoisan, May 23, 2005.


Bryan Gamble, Owner, Red Door Tavern, Naperville, IL

"Other bar owners were telling me that 'you'll change in three months,' but it never crossed my mind. Coming from
Seattle, I didn't even think of having a smoking section and never thought about it until my servers asked me where the smoking
section was going to be."

Quoted In:

Foutz, K., "Restaurant, bar owners say business increased after going smoke-free: proposed state law would allow citywide smoking bans," Suburban Chicago Newspapers, May 23, 2005.


Ina Pinkney, Owner, Ina's Restaurant, Chicago, IL

"My business is more successful because it is smoke-free. People seek us out because of the clean environment. My employees are also healthier and take fewer sick days. In fact, one of the servers here is asthmatic, and she has not missed one day of work since she started because of her asthma."

Quoted In:

American Cancer Society (ACS), Illinois Division, "American Cancer Society launches Smoke-Free Chicago Campaign: Chicago is largest U.S. city not smoke-free," U.S. Newswire, May 6, 2005.


Cyndy Coppola, Owner, Java Joes Coffeehouse, Des Moines, IA

"If I had to do it over again, I would start smoke-free. To be in that kind of an environment, I didn’t think was healthy. I kept waiting for the legislators to pass laws prohibiting it."

Quoted In:

Morain, E., "Going smoke-free can be profitable, owners say," Des Moines Business Journal, May 8, 2005.


Tim Kellogg, Owner, The Cab, Clive, IA

On the impact of making his bar smokefree: "I have had more comments from people who say they appreciate it, and they thank me to no end that somebody was brave enough to go smoke-free."

Quoted In:

Morain, E., "Going smoke-free can be profitable, owners say," Des Moines Business Journal, May 8, 2005.


Christian Johnson, Owner, Spyhouse Espresso Bar and Gallery, Minneapolis, MN

"I didn't even realize how many people don't like smoke. It's ridiculous how many customers we've had. Our sales jumped 14 percent. We noticed new customers the first day."

Quoted In:

Repya, R., "Smoking ban in Southwest: a six-week checkup," Southwest Journal, May 6, 2005.


Chad Jamrozy, Co-Owner, Herkimer Pub and Brewery, Minneapolis, MN

"It's been great for us. [Smokers] want something to do with their hands, so they eat." Jamrozy stated that sales are up by double digits and food sales are up from last year, too.

Quoted In:

Repya, R., "Smoking ban in Southwest: a six-week checkup," Southwest Journal, May 6, 2005.


Charles Irvine, Owner, Sullivan's Downtown, Maryville, TN

"The simple separation between smoking and nonsmoking does not eliminate the dangers of secondhand smoke. I think it's the right thing to do, and I hope our patrons will continue to support us."

Quoted In:

Bales-Sherrod, L., "Sullivan's goes smoke-free June 1," Daily Times, May 3, 2005.


Ed Stack, Manager, 9:30 club, Washington, DC's largest rock venue

"I think people are becoming more aware of how bad for you smoking is. [The bands] are going through all these markets like New York and L.A. and saying that, 'Hey, playing a smoke-free show was pretty cool.' They'll ask [for a smoke-free show] when before they didn't even think it was an option."

Quoted In:

Hahn, F., "A growing refrain: no smoking," Washington Post: WE05, April 29, 2005.


Christine White, Owner, Mcalister's Deli, MI

On why her business is smokefree: "Families know that when they come to Mcalister's Deli, there is no smoking. It's a friendly atmosphere, and they know that their kids will not be exposed to secondhand smoke."

On the impact that permitting smoking would have on her business: "It would have restricted the families that come into the restaurant, the atmosphere of the restaurant, the cleanliness of the restaurant."

Quoted In:

Lewis, T., "Business reaction to proposed smoking ban," WLNS, April 20, 2005.


Mike Cleary, Owner, Dr. Unks, Ocean City, MD

On the decision to make his bar smokefree: "When you go home you don't smell like smoke have to take a shower, wash your hair and stuff like that. We thought a lot about where the future was going and what the trend was going to be."

Quoted In:

Douglass, S., "Smoke-free trend lights up parts of Delmarva," Register-Herald, April 18, 2005.


Susan Jones, Director, Ocean City, MD, Hotel, Motel, Restaurant Association

"More restaurants are catering to the non smokers because they of course outnumber the number of smokers so it definitely is starting to become a trend."

Quoted In:

Douglass, S., "Smoke-free trend lights up parts of Delmarva," Register-Herald, April 18, 2005.


Bill Kalivas, Owner, The Press Box, Pocatello, ID

On choosing to become a smokefree restaurant under a recent Idaho law, rather than remaining a bar with smoking: "It's probably the smartest thing we've been out her, because our business has increased from 20 to 25 percent."

Quoted In:

[n.a.], "Smoking ban results," NBC Newschannel 6, April 11, 2005.


George Harrington, Owner, Lyceum Bar & Grill, Salem, MA

On the economic impact of a statewide smokefree air law on his bar business: ''We're serving a lot more food at the bar. 'People like sitting at the bar, chatting and eating. They didn't do it before because there might be somebody sitting next to them smoking. That's been a major plus for our bar business. 'And now I can wear a shirt two days in a row."


Quoted In:

Smith, S., "Restaurants, bars gain business under smoke ban," Boston Globe, April 4, 2005.


Maria Shepel, Owner, Maria's Kitchen, West Aliquippa, PA

"People really enjoy coming in to eat and not having to worry about having smoke blowing into their face."

Quoted In:

Theodore, L., "Smoke-free restaurants, bars are gaining some acceptance," Beaver County Times & Allegheny Times, March 28, 2005.



Patrick Moore, General Manager, Junior's, Coraopolis, PA

"It looked like old pictures of Pittsburgh back in the steel days. Most people got tired of it. A lot of customers wouldn't come in because the smoke was so bad."

Quoted In:

Theodore, L., "Smoke-free restaurants, bars are gaining some acceptance," Beaver County Times & Allegheny Times, March 28, 2005.


Bobby Williams, President, Lizard’s Thicket restaurant chain, Columbia, SC

On voluntarily going smokefree, Williams noted that the decision was reached because the smoking section was often not full: "It was ridiculous to have a portion of my restaurant empty while there were people waiting to sit down. The smokers complained, but they all came back."

Williams added that going smokefree increased business: "Overall, it’s probably one of the most positive things we’ve done in our business."

Quoted In:

Drake, J.C., "Group wants Columbia to consider smoking ban," The State, March 25, 2005.


Charnae Knight, Spokesperson, Waffle House, Clayton County, GA

Waffle House, which has 10 locations in Clayton County, supports a statewide smokefree bill:

"The smoking ban does not pose a threat to our restaurants. We currently have restaurants located in jurisdictions that have enacted a comprehensive smoke-free law and what we've seen from that is that the ban will not hurt our business."

Quoted In:

Boron, J., "Smoking ban to go back to Senate," News-Daily, March 24, 2005.


Mel Heifetz, Owner, Alexander Inn, Philadelphia, PA

"From my experience of going up to New York, where they do have full ban, and to other cities like Los Angeles and Miami, it has worked very conveniently for smokers and non-smokers. At the inn, we have two out of six floors with smoking ... and you notice if you walk through, the damage to the furniture and walls. The attention these rooms get, in repainting, replacing fabrics and furniture, is five times more than the non-smoking rooms."

Quoted In:

Dickman, A. Baker, M.C., "Proposed smoking ban gets mixed reaction," Philadelphia Gay News 29(12), March 18-24, 2005.


Brad Burdsall, Co-Owner, The Egg and I, Clark County, NV

On deciding to remain smokefree, after participating in a weekend smokefree event: "With this campaign, they paid for all the advertising, questionnaires, etc. What it did was allow us to take one weekend to see what it would be like. We had a wonderful weekend. We had all kinds of news coverage. I think we had one negative response, which was just some diehard regulars who smoked like chimneys. For me, from a business standpoint, it was a really good decision."

Quoted In:

Rinella, H.K., "Up in smoke: clearing the air," Las Vegas Review Journal, March 10, 2005.


Joe Saladino, Owner, Joe's Barbeque, Alvin, TX

On the beneficial economic effect of a smokefree ordinance: "Oh, yeah. I think so. Yeah, yeah. Because people -- a lot of people told me that now they would come here because they didn't have to walk through smoke."

Quoted In:

Miller, D., "Smoking ban old news in one small town," KHOU, March 8, 2005.


Dan Toop, General Manager of Old Broadway, Alexandria, MN

On the reasons why the restaurant will go smokefree: "We think this is what the guests want. And we want to do what’s best for our guests. Reservations are always full in our smoke-free area, while the smoking section is half full, if even that."

Quoted In:

Beam, C., "Smoke-free dining catching on here," EchoPress, March 11, 2005.


Bruce Nichols, President of Museum Catering Co. and former president of the Greater Philadelphia Restaurant and Purveyors Association

"While we and others successfully halted a smoking ban here, entire parts of the globe have since passed smoke-free legislation. Ten states, including Delaware, are smoke-free, along with New York City, Ireland and Italy. (Can France be far behind?) And a growing list of Philadelphia restaurateurs and caterers now favor across-the-board smoke-free legislation for the city. I am one of them."

In response to fears by restaurateurs that customers will travel to the suburbs, where smoking is permitted, Nichols said, "Actual evidence of business failures due to conflicting smoke-friendly/smoke-free jurisdictions is anecdotal, and one of only a thousand factors that can potentially sink a restaurant. From a business perspective, why don't our colleagues focus on the 78 percent of nonsmoking suburbanites - a pool of potential new customers who might just choose newly smoke-free restaurants and bars in Philadelphia over smoky suburban alternatives?"

Quoted In:

Nichols, B., "Smoking ban deserves better," Philadelphia Inquirer, February 10, 2005.


Michael Christakos, Owner, Mays Landing Diner, NJ

"I decided to take the smoking section signs down and replace them with non-smoking signs. I braced myself for all of the negative events my fellow restaurateurs, employees, and customers warned me about. Warnings that included: decreased sales, angry customers, and numerous complaints. I can attest to you, that not only did these events not happen, but I received compliments from my non-smoking customers, understanding from customers who smoked, and an increase in sales. For these reasons, I recommend every New Jersey restaurant to voluntarily go smoke-free and for the legislature to make the right decision and ban smoking from all public places."

Quoted In:

Christakos, M., "[Letter to New Jersey GASP]," Mays Landing, NJ: Mays Landing Diner, February 10, 2005.


Mark Schweiker, President & CEO, Greater Philadelphia Chamber of Commerce, PA

"The facts prove that banning smoking in public places will not adversely affect business. In fact, one year after New York City enacted its smoking ban, business activity actually increased in restaurants and bars and 10,000 jobs were added. We understand the angst of some establishment owners, but we truly believe that this will be a positive for businesses in Philadelphia, both in terms of bottom-line performance and the related health benefits to patrons and employees. This is both a sound business position and a serious public health concern. From the Chamber's standpoint, it makes sense to support a smoking ban. I applaud the Mayor and Councilman Nutter for their farsighted leadership on this matter."

Quoted In:

[n.a.], "Greater Philadelphia Chamber of Commerce Supports City Council Bill to Ban Smoking in Public Places," PRNewswire, March 4, 2005


Jesse Coulter, Co-Owner, Hammer Jacks, Missoula, MT

"We have been smoke-free ever since we opened and we don't intend to ever allow smoking. This is about the health of our workers, children and adult patrons. The great business we've experienced is a bonus.

Quoted In:

Moore, M., "Three bars will go smoke-free on Friday night," Missoulian, March 3, 2005.


Joe Powers, Owner, Canadian Honker, Rochester, MN

"The fears of a smoke-free place of business especially of what I've been through in Rochester is totally overexaggerated. The smoke-free ordinance in Rochester has only affected those businesses that were in trouble before."

Quoted In:

[n.a.], "Smoking bill snuffed out," KTTC-TV, [March 2, 2005].


Lisa Doucet, Spokesperson, Rhode Island Hospitality & Tourism Association

For 17 years, the Rhode Island Hospitality & Tourism Association has polled its membership about a smokefree law. Until last year, the majority of its more than 500 members had opposed such legislation. Lisa Doucet, the association's spokeswoman, said she believes hotel, bar and restaurant owners changed their opinion because consumers changed theirs. "We believe a smoke-free environment is what the marketplace is asking for."

Quoted In:

Lewis, R.C., "Smoking ban takes hold in Rhode Island," Associated Press, February 28, 2005.


Bob Schultz, Convention and Visitors Association, Indianapolis, IN

"According to our research there's no indication that a ban attracts or detracts convention business to a destination."

Quoted In:

Milz, M., "Does smoking ban affect tourism?," WTHR Indianapolis, February 8, 2005.


James McBratney, President of the Staten Island Restaurant and Tavern Association

Initially an outspoken opponent of New York City's smokefree ordinance, McBratney now states, ""I have to admit, I've seen no falloff in business in either establishment."

Quoted In:

Rutenberg, J.; Koppel, L., "In Barrooms, Smoking Ban Is Less Reviled," New York Times, February 6, 2005.


Tony Beckerley, General Manager, Granville Inn

"Having an establishment completely free of smoke is clearly part of a better experience for everyone."

Quoted In:

Miller, B., "Granville Inn bans smoking," Newark Advocate, January 19, 2005.


Bob Rose, Owner, One-O-One, Bridgeton, NJ

"The overall response has been pretty good. There are a few people who have been noticeably absent, but that might be for other circumstances. Most smokers are all right with just going outside to smoke."


Quoted In:

McCullen, S.C., "Angie's Grill, 101 join smoke-free eateries," NJ.com, January 13, 2005.


Doug Van Sant, City Councilman, Bridgeton, NJ and Owner, Angie's Bridgeton Grill

"I realized that a person who smoked could make the decision to come into my restaurant and smoke. But that person who smokes could come in and eat and not smoke. The people that (smoking) offended could not make that choice and had to contend with smoke being blown in their faces."

On possible loss of business: "It's unfortunate, but, I'll tell you, by and large, I've had at least more than a dozen customers come up to me personally and people making phone calls congratulating me for doing it and I haven't had one customer give me damnation for it. But I guess my damnation will be they won't come here anymore."

Quoted In:

McCullen, S.C., "Angie's Grill, 101 join smoke-free eateries," NJ.com, January 13, 2005.


Jason Roger, General Manager, JJ's Pie Company, Las Vegas, NV

Regarding adopting a smokefree policy: "If anything, business has grown more."

Quoted In:

Depoali, M. Stokes, R., "Where there's smoke, there's fire. Nevada's smoking debate lights up," Reno Magazine: 89 , Winter, 2004.


Jason Roger, General Manager, JJ's Pie Company, Las Vegas, NV

Regarding adopting a smokefree policy: "If anything, business has grown more."

Quoted In:

Depoali, M. Stokes, R., "Where there's smoke, there's fire. Nevada's smoking debate lights up," Reno Magazine: 89 , Winter, 2004.


Jordan Rasmussen, Senior Communications Manager, California Restaurant Association

"I don't believe people aren't going to restaurants because they can't smoke there. ... It's healthier for the employees and the people in the restaurant."

Quoted In:

Perkow, C., "Smoke and ire: industry debates the effects of smoking bans," American Brewer 20(4): 16 , Autumn, 2004.


Brendan Moylan, Owner, Marin Brewing Co., Larkspur, CA

"It really hasn't affected business at all. Our community is not a big smoking community. In our early years, we had smoking inside and it was just disgusting. We actually went nonsmoking on our own before we were forced to by law."

Quoted In:

Perkow, C., "Smoke and ire: industry debates the effects of smoking bans," American Brewer 20(4): 16 , Autumn, 2004.



Rick Sampson, President and CEO of New York State Restaurant Association

"One full year after its implementation, the New York state restaurant smoking ban, or 'Clean Indoor Air Act,' as its proponents call it, is a done deal. Public-opinion polls show consumers over-whelmingly support the new law and the leaders of both New York State's Senate and Assembly said publicly that they would not change the law. At a majority of restaurants and catering halls, business is showing a strong upward trend.... That being said, there is a very small contingent of bar owners in New York City who refuse to let this issue die. The industry has a plateful of issues before it right now. It is time to move on."

Quoted in:

[n.a.], "Operators, industry heads still burning over smoking ban," Nation's Restaurant News 38(3): 48, July 26, 2004


Susan Liesch, Co-Owner, Jetset, Minneapolis, MN

Being smokefree "just really adds to the whole feel of the place."

Quoted in:

Pina, P., "Clubs see clear benefits to ban: some nightspots already have gone smokeless," Pioneer Press, August 5, 2004


Lowell Pickett, Owner, Dakota Jazz Club and Restaurant, Minneapolis, MN

On the motivation for going smokefree: "Some think of the romance of a smoke-filled jazz club. But it's hard on the singers and the musicians. The staff is happy, a lot of the customers are happy, and our clothes don't smell like smoke in the morning."

Quoted in:

Pina, P., "Clubs see clear benefits to ban: some nightspots already have gone smokeless," Pioneer Press, August 5, 2004


Jarad Brunfelt, Owner, Meister's, New Scandia Township, MN

On voluntarily going smokefree: "But recently we've been hearing from more and more people who said they didn't bring their families in for dinner because of the smoking."

Quoted in:

Kimball, J., "Smokeless in Scandia," Star Tribune, August 3, 2004


Julie Ruddy, Owner, Meister's, New Scandia Township, MN

On voluntarily going smokefree: "And we have a lot of young people working here; for a while three of the waitresses were pregnant; we felt an obligation to our staff, and the people of the community, to have a healthy environment in here. The response has been so much more positive than negative. We know it's the right thing to do, because the community is telling us that it is."

Quoted in:

Kimball, J., "Smokeless in Scandia," Star Tribune, August 3, 2004


Holly Beyl, Owner, Scandia Cafe, New Scandia Township, MN

On voluntarily going smokefree: "I can see both sides; I knew I'd lose some customers and others might be disgruntled. But some of my customers are getting older, some have oxygen tanks and I worried about the health of my employees. I get at least two thank-yous a day; they grab me, say they've been waiting for this and appreciate it."

Beyl indicated that at first, some regulars went elsewhere for breakfast. After a week, though, most came back. The policy has resulted in tables turning over faster and business has actually improved, said Beyl.

Quoted in:

Kimball, J., "Smokeless in Scandia," Star Tribune, August 3, 2004


Julie Ruddy, Owner of Meister’s Bar and Grill, Scandia, MN

“I think the time is right to do this. I’ve been told over and over by people that they would love to come in and eat, but the smoke keeps them away. I also take my responsibility as an employer seriously and believe my employees shouldn’t have to work in a smoke filled room.”

"I respect our customer’s right to smoke and realize there will probably be customers I won’t see again, but we just have too many families who frequent Meister’s now. I’ve had three pregnant employees recently and have teenagers working for us. They don’t need to be breathing second-hand smoke during their shift.”

Quoted in:

Coleman, B., "Businesses ban smoking," Forest Lake Times, July 21, 2004


Holly Beyl, Owner, Scandia Cafe, Scandia, MN

“The response has been nothing but positive. I bet twice a day I have someone thank me for making the move. I think the smokers realize this is something that’s been coming for a while now. They’ve been pretty understanding.”

Quoted in:

Coleman, B., "Businesses ban smoking," Forest Lake Times, July 21, 2004


Brayom Anderson, Owner, Tie Breakers, Greenville, NC

"Business has steadily grown from day one to now. We are not trying to alienate smokers at all. We want to give them a place to smoke, and we just want the inside smoke-free." Anderson says his private club is the only smoke-free bar and billiards in the state.

Quoted in:

Lusk, K., "Clearing the air: in the heart of tobacco country, more businesses are going smoke-free," WNCT-TV 9, July 23, 2004


Bobbie Wadford, Owner, Bobbie's Beach BINGO, Greenville, NC

"Most of my family does not smoke, and I feel like there are other people in the area that feel the same way, just maybe they haven't had a choice before of something that was smoke-free, so I am stepping out on a limb."

Quoted in:

Lusk, K., "Clearing the air: in the heart of tobacco country, more businesses are going smoke-free," WNCT-TV 9, July 23, 2004


Owner, The Sink Restaurant and Bar, Boulder, CO

The owner of The Sink Restaurant and Bar stated that a smokefree law hadn't hurt his business and in fact led to a healthier staff.

"They used to have persistent coughs and headaches and once the smoking ban went through they felt a lot better. The nicotine was staining the walls, ceilings, everything. So it's much better now."

Quoted in:

Cleaver, M., "Boulder smoking ban: part 2," KOLN/KGIN, July 27, 2004


Josette Fontaine, Waitress, Loxton's, Port Huron, MI

"We haven't lost any of our clientele. And we've gotten an awful lot of compliments."

Quoted in:

[n.a.], "Smoke-free restaurants a success, owners say," Associated Press, July 9, 2004



Jerry Edson, Owern, Raven Coffeehouse, Port Huron, MI

"It's really helped us firm up our business. Almost everything we hear about it is positive. The complaints are really few and far between."

Quoted in:

[n.a.], "Smoke-free restaurants a success, owners say," Associated Press, July 9, 2004



William McGinnis, Customer, Raven Coffeehouse, Port Huron, MI

"Those bad odors and eating just don't go together. I can understand why restaurants want to do this [go smokefree]. It's a good idea."

Quoted in:

[n.a.], "Smoke-free restaurants a success, owners say," Associated Press, July 9, 2004



Andy Nickel, Customer at Misti's Down Under, South Bend, IN

This is the best thing that ever happened here. It smells great now. It has just been great."

Quoted in:

Borgia, M., "Smoke-free switch pays off: restaurants take plunge and survive," South Bend Tribune, July 4, 2004



Misti Rooks, Owner, Misti's Down Under, South Bend, IN

"I love that I don't come home smelling like smoke anymore. I feel a lot better and it's much more pleasant to work here now." Rooks noted that she no longer needs to spend money and time to clean smoke residue, "I was amazed how much smoke was on chairs, tables and equipment."


Quoted in:

Borgia, M., "Smoke-free switch pays off: restaurants take plunge and survive," South Bend Tribune, July 4, 2004



Bob Kill, President and CEO, Hacienda Mexican Restaurants, IN

On voluntarily going smokefree in the dining area: "It was a pretty easy decision for us because smoking sections are getting smaller." Kill noted, "Sales are smoking."


Quoted in:

Borgia, M., "Smoke-free switch pays off: restaurants take plunge and survive," South Bend Tribune, July 4, 2004



Dennis Witkowski, Owner, J.J. Muggs, Abacoa, FL

Regarding Florida's smokefree restaurant law: "It's just become an accepted fact of life, almost as though we've never smoked in this industry."

Quoted in:

Brannock, J., "No butts about it: Smoking ban a success," TCPalm, June 30, 2004



Doug Uccellini, Manager, Thirsty Turtle, Juno Beach, FL

"You see a lot more families coming in now, and a lot more women sitting at the bar who, maybe before, didn't want to get smoke on their clothes. We've had a little increase in business here, because the ones that wouldn't come out before and coming out now."

Quoted in:

Brannock, J., "No butts about it: Smoking ban a success," TCPalm, June 30, 2004



Bruce Caprara, Manager, Jupiter Ale House

Regarding the implementation of Florida's smokefree law, Caprara noted that business initially dropped about 3 percent but then rebounded and increased. "I think at first people were anti going to the bars where they had smoked at for years, but I think they eventually just went back to their routine and started smoking outside. It's all balanced out. I think people just like going into a less smoky restaurant to eat their dinner."

Quoted in:

Brannock, J., "No butts about it: Smoking ban a success," TCPalm, June 30, 2004



Jimmy Halstead, Jerry's Drive-In, Florida

"It's been going super for us. Business has probably increased 20 percent."

Quoted in:

[n.a.], "Smoking ban: one year later," WEAR TV3 (Pensacola, FL), June 23, 2004



Sandra Lowe, General Manager, Legal Tender Restaurant, WY

"We've been open for 20 years, and more and more of the smoking section was being left empty [in recent years]. We couldn't fulfill the needs [of the non-smokers] fast enough ... It was definitely time to change."

Quoted in:

Madrid, M., "Local restaurants go smoke-free," Uinta County (WY) Herald, June 12, 2004



Dave McCracken, Owner, Overtime Sports Pub & Grub, Bettendorf, IA

McCracken stated of his new smokefree bar, "It's not an anti-smoking establishment, it's just that smoking is not allowed in the building. I never wanted to take my coat into bars - even in sub-zero weather - because it would smell like smoke when I left. So I'm opening a bar and grill where everyone will feel comfortable."

From his research, McCracken said he learned that about 3 percent of the general population will not patronize a smokeless bar. "I'll take my chance on the other 97 percent."

Quoted in:

DeWitt, J., "Smokeless bar to open in Bettendorf," Quad-City Times, June 11, 2004



Yael Esra, General manager of Soyka's Restaurant Cafe and Bar, Miami, FL

''It hasn't affected us at all. Smokers still come and go to the outside patio, have a cigarette and come back in. 'Sometimes they go out and just take their cocktail with them. They chitchat at the bar, go outside to smoke, come in and eat, then go out and smoke again and so on.''

Quoted in:

Garber, R., "Fear over ban has gone up in smoke," Miami Herald, June 10, 2004



Tony Puche, General manager of the Van Dyke, FL

''I think the first couple of months that the ban took effect, a lot of our customers were unaware, so there was a two-to-three-month transition period when people wanted to light up and we had to stop them. But, after that, it just slowly phased away, and now things are fine. I have always preferred people not to smoke.''

Quoted in:

Garber, R., "Fear over ban has gone up in smoke," Miami Herald, June 10, 2004



Loni Hall, Assistant Manager of the Bigg Blue Martini, Lexington, KY

"We were worried. But it [a smokefree ordinance] hasn't had that much of an effect."

Quoted in:

Isaacs, B., "Puffing in public," Lexington Herald-Leader, June 2, 2004



Karen Weinert, Dining room manager at Pat's Pizza, Grayslake, MN

Regarding going smokefree: "It's a family restaurant. There are children galore. Except for a handful, people are thrilled."

Quoted in:

Sykora, A., "Smoke-free restaurants on the rise," Gurnee Review, May 20, 2004



Costas Constantinou, Retail Director, Drucker's Patisserie Café, England

The cafe is part of a chain of 33, and it testing out a smokefree policy: "As the years have progressed, there has been a move to have non-smoking establishments and because of the greater risk to non-smokers.So we thought we have to do our job and introduce the ban. Cafés that we have opened recently have been non-smoking and we have had a positive feedback from customers. It just shows that people prefer a non-smoking environment. So soon, people in Worcester will be able to enjoy their food with a non-smoking experience."

Quoted in:

[n.a.], "Café breaks with tradition on smoke," ThisisWorcestershire.co.uk, May 17, 2004



Jerry Gillotti, Owner, Gilly's in Dayton, Ohio

The jazz club instituted a voluntary smokefree policy, and owner Gillotti stated, "Everybody is extremely excited about it. We've had three shows (since going smoke-free) and no problems. I've had a tremendous amount of e-mails and they were all encouraging."

Quoted in:

Link, W., "Gilly's clears smoke at shows: most respond positively to jazz club's new policy," Dayton Daily News, May 15, 2004



Greg Ekbom, Day by Day Cafe, St. Paul, MN

Re: decision to go smokefree: "...the only regret I have is that we didn't do it 25 years ago.''

Quoted in:

Karlson, K., "St. Paul considers ban on smoking," St. Paul Pioneer Press, May 6, 2004



Toni Lucario, Director of sales and marketing for the Grand Hotel, AZ

"We're well under 20 percent [of smoking rooms]. We'll continue to offer smoking rooms but we're already almost entirely non."

Quoted in:

Brown, J., "Smoking snuffed by county order," Grand Canyon News, February 5, 2004



Cecilia Marotto, Communications Specialist, Harrah's Laughlin, Laughlin, NV

Re: nonsmoking casino area: "Our customers absolutely love it. It's very popular with our health-conscious guests. The gaming area is truly divided, but both sides have exciting gaming. We point very sensitive people to the left, others to the right."

Quoted in:

LaRocca, W., "Smoking... or non? From poker rooms to showrooms, Nevada's hotel-casinos are clearing the air for nonsmoking customers," Nevada Magazine, May/June, 2004



Gary Stevens, Slot Director at Colorado Belle, Laughlin, NV

"Customers' requests drive the change to smoke-free spaces. We have a 5,000-square-foot nonsmoking area that features a variety of our players' favorite slot machines."

Quoted in:

LaRocca, W., "Smoking... or non? From poker rooms to showrooms, Nevada's hotel-casinos are clearing the air for nonsmoking customers," Nevada Magazine, May/June, 2004



John Packer, Harveys Resort & Casino spokesman, Lake Tahoe, NV

Re: smokefree poker room: "Everybody loves it - even the smokers. A majority of our players from California have become culturized to it."

Quoted in:

Wood, S., "Less smoke pleases poker players," Tahoe Tribune, December 11, 2003



Matt Wall, Owner, O'Sullivans Pub, Somerville, MA

Regarding a smokefree ordinance: "I was opposed to it before it was passed. But, as it is now I'm pretty happy about the ban."

Quoted in:

Schubin, J, "Somerville Aldermen reconsider smoking ban: Massachusetts to pass statewide ban soon," Tufts Daily, November 19, 2003



Mark Kretz, Manager of Laudisio Italian Restaurant, Boulder, CO

Kretz stated that Boulder smokers thought "life was going to collapse, bar sales are going to go down. But it isn't true. People adjust."

Quoted in:

Heckel, A., "Smoking infractions few: six people have been cited for breaking ban," Daily Camera, November 17, 2003


 

 

Mike Scanlon, CEO and president of Thomas & King and Vice Mayor of Lexington, Kentucky

"I can see both sides of the issue. However, as a businessman, I need to listen to my customers and do what I believe is right for my business. Our guests absolutely love these smoke-free environments. This is strictly an effort to reach out to our guests and to give them what they want."

Quoted in:

Evans, M., "Restaurants operated by Kentucky company to go smokefree," Associated Press/Charlotte Observer, May 10, 2004


Mike Scanlon, CEO and president of Thomas & King and Vice Mayor of Lexington, Kentucky

"The No. 1 way to drive customer sales is to drive customer satisfaction. The No. 1 way to drive customer satisfaction is to take all of our stores, almost 80 of them, smoke-free."

Quoted in:

Qu, M., "Applebee's restaurants go smoke-free," Lexington Herald-Leader, May 11, 2004


Mike Scanlon, CEO and president of Thomas & King and Vice Mayor of Lexington, Kentucky

On a decision by Thomas & King, the third-largest Applebee's franchisee in the country, to make its 16 franchises in the Greater Cincinnati, Ohio, area smokefree: "This is a business decision, and that's where this needs to be. I'm not a health expert. This is what our customers want. They are saying that they don't want smoking in the restaurants and that they're not coming in as much because of the smoke. Even when you have a smoke-free section, the smoke still bleeds in." Scanlon noted that sales at franchises in Sierra Vista, Arizona, and Sidney, Ohio, increased after going smokefree, with a 30 percent rise in Sierra Vista. Scanlon added, "There are a lot of myths about no smoking policies -- that your employees will quit, your guests will quit coming, and the place will be empty. We've proved every one of those myths wrong."

Quoted In:

Paeth, G., "Going smokeless: it's just good business, Applebee's franchisee says," Cincinnati Post, May 13, 2004.


Cheryl Patzer, Owner, Coffe Cup Cafe, Hamilton, Montana

"My employees deserve to breathe clean air, and my health is deteriorating, so I made the choice."

Quoted In:

Daniel, R., "Clearing the air: owner of venerable Hamilton restaurant decides to go smoke-free," Ravalli News, April 28, 2004.


Jonathan Satayathum, General Manager, Great Lakes Brewing Company in Ohio City, Ohio

"Sales are up. The place is cleaner. The air is clear. People in Cleveland have an alternative place to go."

Quoted In:

Thomas, P., "Willoughby Hills deli puts non-smoking decision to customers," WKYC, April 15, 2004.


Scott Wise, President and CEO of Scotty's Brewhouse, Bloomington, IN

"It makes me feel good that we are being responsible citizens by providing a smoke free environment for our workers and customers. It reflects our commitment to maintaining cleanliness throughout the restaurant from the restrooms to the floors to the air we breathe. At first I was nervous about being smoke free, but I soon found out that people absolutely loved it. Our business wasn't affected at all." Wise's success with being smoke free in Bloomington has prompted him to go smoke-free at his Muncie location as well. He said, "We decided to phase in the change, so we continued to allow smoking in the bar. To my surprise, the bartenders requested that we ban smoking in the bar, so on May 1, our Muncie restaurant will be completely smoke free."

Quoted In:

Macy, J., "[Email communication]," [n.s.], May 3, 2004.


Jerry Gillotti, Owner, Gilly's Nightclub, Dayton, OH

"I know that there are people who won't come in because of the smoke. And I figure the smokers will come if they like the music. They'll only be going without smoking for an hour-and-a-half. When I had heart surgery a few years ago, they told me my lungs were black. And I don't smoke."

Quoted In:

[n.a.], "Gilly's nightclub going smoke-free," Dayton Daily News, May 6, 2004.


Joe Manifredi, Owner of Billy Wilson's Ageing Still, Norwich, CT

Manifredi said his customers are mostly happy with the state's new smokefree law and that it hasn't harmed business:

"I've had more positive comments about air quality than complaints. Personally, it is nice to go home and not smell like smoke,. I think if (the ban) was going to have an effect, it would've happened already."


Quoted In:

Chang, S., "Smoke-free bars: despite the smoker ballyhoo, nonsmokers seem pleased," Norwich Bulletin, April 5, 2004.


Dan Sencier, Manager, Lauriston Farm Brewers Fayre, Edinburgh, Scotland

The Lauriston Farm Brewers Fayre restaurant and bar in Edinburgh has become the first pub in Scotland to voluntarily go smokefree. The business initially made only its restaurant smokefree, but extended the policy to the bar after profits rose. Sencier said that five employees had quit smoking since the policy took effect and added, "We have had very positive feedback and seen our sales boom as a result of the smoking ban in the restaurant. I went on holiday to the United States and found that a smoking ban in restaurants is the norm. People know it’s not allowed and the policy is viewed favourably. In Scotland, however, although 13,000 people die from smoking-related diseases every year, people still expect to be able to smoke in restaurants. Maybe it will take longer to change people’s views over here. However, we know it makes good business sense."


Quoted In:

Christian, N., "First pub to impose total smoking ban," Scotsman.com, February 29, 2004.


Mark Larson, Owner, M&M Truck Stop and Family Restaurant, Cortez, CO and State Representative for House District 59

"You can imagine my angst at taking my truck stop nonsmoking. After all, many truckers smoke and they are a significant percentage of my clientele. Initially, we had a few customers walk out. However, I cannot think of one customer that has not returned because of the policy. I was ready to reinstate the smoking policy in a heartbeat if things didn't work out, but all of my fears were quieted in a very short time. The no-smoking policy increased my local customer base, expanded my tourism base, and kept my truckers coming too. Now that we are smoke-free my employee absences are reduced, my facility is easier to keep clean, and seating customers is faster and simpler. Best of all, I have the peace of mind that a truck stop can successfully go nonsmoking and not lose sales volume."

Quoted In:

Larson, M., "Truck Stop Owner/Legislator Says Economic Fears Never Materialized," GASP of Colorado Web Site — http://www.gaspforair.org/gasp/, 2004.


Dean El-Taher, Owner and chef of the Yanwath Gate Inn, England

Dean said industry colleagues warned him against the no-smoking policy. But nine out of 10 people are giving it the thumbs-up and the policy is bringing in new customers from a wider area: “Diners eat in the bar, which has an open fire, or in the upper or lower restaurants, so it makes sense to have no smoking throughout the building.”

Quoted In:

[n.a.], "Cigarette ban proves popular with diners," Cumberland News, March 5, 2004.


Charlie Anderson, Owner, Pit Stop Bar & Grill, Lisbon, N.D.

"As owner/operator of The Pit Stop in Lisbon, N.D., I am proud to say that as of Feb. 14 we are the only “smoke free bar and grill” in Ransom and Sargent counties. Smoking is banned in the entire facility and the response has been overwhelming! We are seeing many more family groups, as well as a more upscale clientele.

As controversy continues in the Fargo/Moorhead area of a smoking ban in restaurants and bars, we began to ask our town what they wanted. The answer was literally 'butt out!'

It is our hope that we can set an example for the larger establishments and let them know that even our smoking customers don’t mind stepping out to satisfy the craving. If the food is good enough, they will be loyal to your business."


Quoted In:

Anderson, C., "Charlie Anderson letter: Smoking ban works in Lisbon bar, grill," The Forum, March 5, 2004.


Kent Rathbun, Chef & Owner, Abacus & Jasper's, Dallas, TX

"Opening smokefree, we quickly won over the most demanding diners in Texas. What does that tell you? If anybody tells you smokefree measures hurt hospitality, don't believe it."

"We work hard to create an atmosphere. Why pollute it? Secondhand smoke is a proven health hazard, a physical irritant, and deadens the taste and smell. It's plain incompatible with the enjoyment of good food."

Quoted In:

TobaccoScam, "TobaccoScam: Big Tobacco is lying again," Nation's Restaurant News 37(47): 61, November 24, 2003.


Gary Baba, Owner of Bonanza, Saskatoon, Canada

On voluntarily going smokefree in advance of a smokefree bylaw: "I've had customers phone me, congratulating me and saying, 'I'm coming back now, because I wouldn't come to your restaurant (previously) because of smoking.'" Baba added: "We're not losing the smoking clientele that we thought we were going to lose, but we've gained a lot. We're still getting
smokers in here."

Quoted In:

Kinvig, D., "Smoke-free restaurants get positive response," Saskatoon StarPhoenix, February 23, 2004.


Dean Cooper, General manager at Moxie's Classic Grill, Saskatoon, Canada

On voluntarily going smokefree in advance of a smokefree bylaw: "The majority of reservations were non-smoking," Cooper said, noting that smokers made up only five to 10 per cent of sales. "It got down to where we were running half a restaurant." Cooper added: "It's been very, very positive for the business in total. For the amount (of customers) we've lost, we've probably gained 10 more."


Quoted In:

Kinvig, D., "Smoke-free restaurants get positive response," Saskatoon StarPhoenix, February 23, 2004.


Keith Bloch, Manager at Red Lobster, Saskatoon, Canada

On voluntarily going smokefree: "People are very happy about it. That's why they come here now, because it's non-smoking."

Quoted In:

Kinvig, D., "Smoke-free restaurants get positive response," Saskatoon StarPhoenix, February 23, 2004.


Rob Carter, Night Manager, The Fort, Dartmouth, NH

Regarding going smokefree voluntarily, Carter noted that formerly slow times are now busy, with more families and younger patrons visiting than ever before. The policy caused an initial drop in patronage among regulars who smoke, but most have found themselves still coming back for the food. "Most people don't mind the policy. Thirty minutes isn't that long to ask
people to go without a cigarette."

Quoted In:

Schoen, L., "The Fort truck stop says 'no' to smoking," Dartmouth Online, February 9, 2004.


Greg Garner, General Manager, Sweetwater's Donut Mill, Kalamazoo, MI

On going smokefree and complaints from some smokers:

"That's been disappointing, but overall it has been positive. We are absolutely delighted we did it." Garner said the restaurant went smokefree when it discovered that some nonsmoking customers who commonly get donuts to go stopped coming in because of the smoke inside the restaurants.

Quoted In:

Wood, B., "Two more food establishments go smoke-free," Kalamazoo Gazette, February 2, 2004.


Pasquali Rulli, Owner, Pasquale's, Mishawaka, IN

"We've had a couple of people that said they wouldn't be back but I figure if we gain five and lose two it might be better in the long run."

Quoted In:

Relerford, M., "Local restaurant closes its door on smoking," WNDU-TV, January 31, 2004.


Tony Noto, Co-owner, Noto's Old World Italian Dining and Banquet Center,
Cascade Township, MI

On being smokefree:

"People thought we were crazy. The restaurant association might not agree with our family's standpoint, but we think health is a priority. And when you come to our restaurant, you don't have to worry about going to the cleaners the day after." Noto added that his business may expand and that he no longer has to concern himself with smoke stains on the ceiling or burn marks on the carpet.

Quoted In:

Putnam, J. King, K., "More restaurants ban smoking: owners say trend shows state ban isn't needed," Grand Rapids Press, January 26, 2004.


Gavin McMillian, Owner and chef at Fiddleheads, Royal Oak, MI

Regarding opening as a smokefree restaurant:

"We weren't sure what was going to happen. We're such a small space, if we allowed people to smoke at the bar, 10 tables around it would be affected by the smoke. Business is fine without (smoking). We've been open three months, and we're making a profit." McMillian stated that "99.99 percent" of his reservation callers want nonsmoking.

Quoted In:

Hopkins, C., "Some restaurateurs fight banon smoking in dining areas," Oakland Press, January 25, 2004.


Betty Farris, Owner of Harry's Cafe, Pittsburg, KS

"I had the carpet cleaned Monday, and things are so much cleaner now. You look out, and there are no clouds of smoke anywhere in the cafe. I've already got families who wouldn't come here before because of the smoke, and now they're coming in with their children. I've been getting a lot of good vibes from customers. I think this is a good trend, and I invite other restaurants to join us."

Quoted In:

Patrick, N., "Going smokeless," Morning Sun, January 25, 2004.


Don Wynne, Owner of Sonny's Real Pit Barbecue in Jackson and Brandon, MS

"I just didn't see it hurting a family-style restaurant like ourselves, and, so far, it hasn't."


Quoted In:

Hipp, L., "City's smoking ban authority questioned: some restaurateurs say final decision should be up to owner," Clarion-Ledger, November 19,
2003.


Queta Castrellon, Manager, Don Jose's Restaurant in Kenai, AK

'"Pretty much (the customers) are OK. I think they pretty much know what's going on. I don't think (the ban) is effecting us much. Most of our customers are happy, now they have more room sit."

Quoted In:

Neyman, J., "Kenai joins smoke-out: most restaurants feel little effect from city's new ordinance," Peninsula Clarion, October 20, 2003.


Dave Williams, Manager, Taco John's

"I think it's nice for everyone now that employees and customers do not have to breathe in second-hand smoke. Our cleaning tasks have been reduced since going smoke-free."

Quoted In:

[n.a.], "Americans for Nonsmokers' Rights honor Maryville for city ordinance," Maryville Daily Forum, [January 26, 2003].


Richard Malia, Owner, Ponti Seafood Grill, King County, WA

On his smokefree restaurant: "The response has been extremely positive, they've been very supportive, even the smokers."

Quoted In:

Parker, J., "'I Strongly Dislike Smoking, It Ruins Peoples' Lives'," KOMO 1000 News, January 20, 2004.



Kevin Maloy, Waiter, Ponti Seafood Grill, King County, WA

On working in a smokefree restaurant: "The greatest thing about it was the absence of smoke. It was hard to contain, it would filter into the dining area."

Quoted In:

Parker, J., "'I Strongly Dislike Smoking, It Ruins Peoples' Lives'," KOMO 1000 News, January 20, 2004.


Dennis Cooper, Owner, 21-23 Broadway, Kingston, NY

Cooper opened his new restaurant as a non-smoking establishment before the statewide smoking ban. Cooper said he's saved on climate control equipment and floors and furniture, which have no burn marks from fallen cigarettes.

Quoted In:

Ment, J., "Restaurateur banks on boom in Downtown," Daily Freeman, January 11, 2004.


James Wooley, General Manager of Archie Moore’s in New Haven, CT

Re: economic impact of state smokefree law:

"I’m sad for the smokers, but it’s been good."

Quoted In:

Missakian, N., "Smoking ban fears fail to materialize," New Haven Register, January 12, 2004.


 

John Daougis, Owner of the Athenian Diner in New Haven, CT

Re: economic impact of state smokefree law:

"A lot smoother than I thought it would be. During the day, people like it more, actually. It’s my night business that was affected a little bit. That’s about it."

Quoted In:

Missakian, N., "Smoking ban fears fail to materialize," New Haven Register, January 12, 2004.


Carl Perin, Owner, Dooley's Deli, Cincinnati, OH

On voluntarily going smokefree:

"Everyone said if I went smoke-free that I'd go out of business. But actually, business has doubled."


Quoted In:

Leingang, M., "Smoke-free eateries recognized," Cincinnati Enquirer, January 15, 2004.


 

Tim and Tammy Hagensen, Owners, TnT’s Café, Fargo, ND

On voluntarily going smokefree:

"We have managed and owned a restaurant in the F-M area for over 10 years; Trollwood Café in north Fargo from 1993-1999 and TnT’s Café in the Moorhead Center Mall since 1999.

When we opened in Fargo, many people said choosing to be smoke-free was a decision that would put us out of business. Trollwood Café turned out to be a successful and profitable business during our time there. (It should be noted that previous to 1993, two other restaurants in that same location had failed due to lack of business, and both had offered smoking areas.) Many employees smoked, but all were very appreciative of having clean air to work and breathe in.

We purchased our current location in 1999, which served as a Highway Host restaurant for over 25 years. It has a booth area and a 12-seat counter that was a popular place for customers who were heavy smokers. Again, we were warned by a number of people, including former Highway Host servers, that it was going to hurt our chances to succeed. Several months after opening, those same servers were enthusiastic supporters of having a smoke-free environment to work in, even though they continued to be smokers themselves.

Currently we have a number of employees who smoke, yet enjoy working in a smoke-free environment and wouldn’t want it any other way."

Quoted In:

Hagensen, T. Hagensen, T., "Other views: Put health of restaurant customers, workers first," Forum, January 15, 2004.


 

Mary Lee Williams, Waitress at Creekview Restaurant, Williamsville, NY

"It's increased our business, it's nicer air to breathe, and you don't walk out of the restaurant at night smelling of smoke."


Quoted In:

Warner, G., "Focus: smoking ban enjoying no smoke," Buffalo News, November 25, 2003.



David C. Schutte, Owner Creekview Restaurant, Williamsville, NY

Schutte stated that business is up 10 percent since the state enacted a smokefree air law, and attributes half of the increase to the law:

"There's a quiet majority out there who enjoy the bar scene but did not frequent a bar because of the smoking. We're finding that they're coming out now. I've never been for the government dictating what I have to do in my business. I was not looking forward to the change, but I was pleasantly surprised by the impact. More diners are are going to the bar to wait for a table, enjoy a drink, and people are dining in there. We're also seeing more of hte nonsmokers realize what the smoking ban means for them. Now they're walking in and saying, 'It's really nice. There's no smoke.'"


Quoted In:

Warner, G., "Focus: smoking ban enjoying no smoke," Buffalo News, November 25, 2003.


 

Stephanie Nowack, President and CEO of the Tempe (AZ) Convention and Visitors Bureau

The bureau surveyed Tempe, Arizona, visitors for their reaction to the city's smokefree ordinance. More than 84 percent of the respondents said the ban on indoor smoking was "a positive attribute of the destination," according to Stephanie Nowack, president and CEO of the Tempe CVB.

Quoted In:

Foreman, D., "Where are those failing bars?" Arizona Republic, September 25, 2003.

 



Jeff Grayson, Chairman, Florida Restaurant Association and owner of an Orlando Pizzeria Uno

"We've overly neglected the bar business potential of nonsmokers who've been opting not to sit themselves in smoke-laden restaurant bars. But I'm hearing from peers at Outback and similar places where smoking is no longer allowed that their bars are more crowded now. So I think this is something we can all look forward to."

Quoted In:

Hayes, J., "Signals mixed on new Florida smoking ban," Nation's Restaurant News 37(26): 6 , June 30, 2003.

 



Mike Bernstein, Media & Communications Director for Darden Restaurants (parent company of Red Lobster, Olive Garden, Bahama Breeze, and Smokey Bones chains)

Regarding going smokefree in advance of Florida's law: "We felt an obligation to voters who overwhelmingly approved the amendment. But our decision has had no meaningful impact on business. And there's been hardly any response in guest relations, although nonsmoker feedback has been generally more positive. It's really too soon to say how it may affect business in the long run."

Quoted In:

Hayes, J., "Signals mixed on new Florida smoking ban," Nation's Restaurant News 37(26): 6 , June 30, 2003.

 



Brett Carper, Co-Owner, Charlie & Jake's Brewery & Grille, FL

Regarding Florida's smokefree air law: "From the service aspect, it's going to be a lot easier with non-smoking. As far as traffic and revenue, our smoking section has always been either really good or really bad, and now that worry is gone for the servers and the owners."

Quoted In:

Hayes, J., "Signals mixed on new Florida smoking ban," Nation's Restaurant News 37(26): 6 , June 30, 2003.

 



Unidentified California Smoker,

"[California] banned smoking in public places years ago. I smoke. At first, I defied the ban, hated the government intrusion, and sided with my fellow bar patrons that the ban was the worst thing that ever happened and agreed with them that the ban would cause them financial ruin. Well, years later, none of my watering holes went belly up. NONE. The bickering has stopped, and we've all accepted the fact that one cannot smoke in a public place. It's not a big deal."

Quoted In:

Lemmon, R., "2 gadflies step down; both will be missed," Toledo Blade, October 5, 2003.

 



Frank Heath, Owner, Cat's Cradle in Carrboro, North Carolina

"So far, so good. Although one of the Driveby Truckers made a joke when they played here: 'A North Carolina club banning smoking, that's like public transportation in Detroit.' But it's been pretty well-accepted, and I feel confident it will boost attendance. I assumed some people would just ignore it and light up. But most haven't."


Quoted In:

Menconi, D., "Cradle's rockin', but no smoking," News & Observer, October 22, 2003.

 



Dean Aberle, Owner, Homesteaders Restaurant, Minot, ND

"Business is up dramatically. People say they come in more often because we are smoke-free. Our wait staff's comments are really favorable regarding not having to breathe in secondhand smoke."

Quoted In:

[n.a.], "'Business is up dramatically' and other quotes from Minot restaurateurs," Minot, ND: STAMP; North Dakota Center for Persons with Disabilities (NDCPD); Tobacco Education, Research & Policy Project (TERPP), STAMP, [2003].

 



Dean Aberle, Owner, Homesteaders Restaurant, Minot, ND

"Business has been better. We've only been smokefree for about a month, but the increase in business is noticeable."

Quoted In:

[n.a.], "'Business is up dramatically' and other quotes from Minot restaurateurs," Minot, ND: STAMP; North Dakota Center for Persons with Disabilities (NDCPD); Tobacco Education, Research & Policy Project (TERPP), STAMP, [2003].

 



Janelle Herslip, Proprietor, Denny's Restaurant, Minot, ND

"Being a 24-hour restaurant seemed to affect us a bit more. When (the ordinance) went into effect, January and February were down a lot. It affected that graveyard shift. As it went on, things got better and better. As far as sales overall, we don't think it has affected us at all. I think we get a lot less people sitting here a long period of time. There are advantages - being able to seat people more easily. I think it's a great advantage to staff. And for us it's an advantage not having the smell, the ash trays."

Quoted In:

[n.a.], "'Business is up dramatically' and other quotes from Minot restaurateurs," Minot, ND: STAMP; North Dakota Center for Persons with Disabilities (NDCPD); Tobacco Education, Research & Policy Project (TERPP), STAMP, [2003].

 



Owner, Blue Rider, Minot, ND

"We opened the smoke-free bar to give nonsmokers a place to socialize. We have wonderful clientele form a wide range of occupations and professions. What they have in common is the desire to escape the smoke and enjoy themselves."

Quoted In:

[n.a.], "'Business is up dramatically' and other quotes from Minot restaurateurs," Minot, ND: STAMP; North Dakota Center for Persons with Disabilities (NDCPD); Tobacco Education, Research & Policy Project (TERPP), STAMP, [2003].

 



Abe Sakak, CEO Applecore Inc., Minot, North Dakota

"Our guests are important both smokers, and non-smokers. However we believe that there is a day that we all have to (even Applebee's) go to a non-smoking environment. Business will go on either way. Our guests might not be able to smoke in the restaurant of their choice, but we think our guests will come to their Applebee's Neighborhood Grill & Bar for their favorite food, fun & drink."

Quoted In:

[n.a.], "'Business is up dramatically' and other quotes from Minot restaurateurs," Minot, ND: STAMP; North Dakota Center for Persons with Disabilities (NDCPD); Tobacco Education, Research & Policy Project (TERPP), STAMP, [2003].

 



Vern Korgel, Manager, Royal Fork Restaurant, Minot, North Dakota

"Going smoke-free has been a plus. In addition to eliminating the health risks of secondhand smoke, maintenance on ceiling and walls of the restaurant has been a lot less since we went smoke-free."

Quoted In:

[n.a.], "'Business is up dramatically' and other quotes from Minot restaurateurs," Minot, ND: STAMP; North Dakota Center for Persons with Disabilities (NDCPD); Tobacco Education, Research & Policy Project (TERPP), STAMP, [2003].

 



Gordon Troxel, Owner, Nite Train Pizza, Minot, North Dakota

"Our business is mainly delivery, (but) we went smoke-free about 10 years ago, mainly for the people who work here. It's a lot easier on our employees; and the people who come in here for breakfast don't have to worry about the smoke."

Quoted In:

[n.a.], "'Business is up dramatically' and other quotes from Minot restaurateurs," Minot, ND: STAMP; North Dakota Center for Persons with Disabilities (NDCPD); Tobacco Education, Research & Policy Project (TERPP), STAMP, [2003].


Chris Canavos, Manager, Howard Johnson's, Williamsburg, VA

On going smokefree in the entire hotel: "In all of our publications, we promote a smoke-free environment, and we've gotten calls because of it. Families with kids, it's attractive to them. It reinforces cleanliness and safety."

Quoted In:

Linkous, J., "More hotels put up the 'no smoking' sign," Lexington Herald-Leader, September 22, 2003.


P.J. McAfee, Co-owner of the Beef’n Barrel in Olean, NY

Re: statewide smokefree law: “I think it’s improved our business for the most part."

Quoted In:

Karl, D., "Smoking ban's local impact is mixed," Times-Herald, September 21, 2003.


Lawrence Shea, Manager of the Sports Bar in Binghamton, New York

"Short term, people are used to smoking and drinking. Long term, however, they're still going to smoke, they're still going to drink. And they just learn to separate the two. And actually, in the long term, some people find that they like the smoke-free environment better."

Quoted In:

Suna, A. Chayes, M., "Bar business is thriving despite new smoke ban," Binghamton University Pipe Dream, September 9, 2003.


Sue Jordan, Manager of Ryans Family Dining in Minot, ND

Re: smokefree ordinance: "We have lost a few [customers], but we have also gained a lot that didn't come in here because of smoking."

Quoted In:

Schramm, J., "Ordinance isn't affecting restaurants: MSU study shows no-smoking law not having negative economic impact on sales," Minot Daily News, June 6, 2003.


Jeff Edwards, General manager of Nick's Original House of Ribs in Ocean City, MD

With regard to claims by Delaware restaurateurs that their customers are going to Maryland in order to be able to smoke while dining: "In the beginning we had a little increase, but now it is pretty much the normal clientele. I think people have habits that they like to stick to."

Quoted In:

Vandiver, J., "Ban isn't sending smokers to OC: business owners say few cross the border to smoke in Maryland bars and restaurants," Daily Times, June 9, 2003.


Chris Gee, Bar manager of the Greene Turtle in Ocean City, MD

With regard to claims by Delaware restaurateurs that their customers are going to Maryland in order to be able to smoke while dining: "I know some bartenders in Delaware and they say it's not as bad as their owners are saying. Some of our employees who don't smoke go there after work to get away from it. It's definitely not boosting our happy hour sales too much."

Quoted In:

Vandiver, J., "Ban isn't sending smokers to OC: business owners say few cross the border to smoke in Maryland bars and restaurants," Daily Times, June 9, 2003.


Thomas Vona, Owner of Vona's Restaurant in NY

On going smokefree in both the restaurant and bar, "The bar business did decrease initially. It has leveled off. But the dinner business definitely picked up."

Quoted In:

McAndrew, M., "Eateries survive ban on smoking: restaurateurs who snuffed out cigarette use say they are glad they did," Syracuse Post-Standard, June 9, 2003.


Tom Yengo, Owner of Benchwarmers Sports Bar & Grill in New York State

"We've actually seen a substantial increase in our business. We've seen a lot of new faces as a result of it. We have regular customers who smoke and I haven’t seen any less of them. They just get up, go out and have a cigarette and come back in. They have voiced some concerns about it, but haven’t complained.”

Quoted In:

Harenda, A., "State sends a no smoking mandate to restaurants," The Ithacan, September 4, 2003.


Bill Basler, Manager of Portofino, Malden, MA

On voluntarily going smokefree: "We noticed that the majority of our clients wanted to be in the non-smoking section. We had to keep making the smoking section smaller and smaller."

Basler said that cutting out the smoking section has attracted customers: "We had people who wouldn't come when there was still smoking here. Now, people know there's no smoking."

Quoted In:

Michaels, S.D., "Split opinions on eatery smoking ban," Malden Observer, September 3, 2003.


Bob Woolman, Owner and manager of Taco Pronto in McAlester, OK

Regarding the construction of a ventilated smoking room in his restaurant: "Most of the smokers don't smoke during meals and prefer the nonsmoking section. Building the separately ventilated smoking room is the worst business investment I have made, and I would encourage any restaurant owner to go smoke-free."

Quoted In:

English, P., "Eateries told to go smokeless," Tulsa World, August 28, 2003.


Don Coit, Coit's, Oklahoma City, OK

"We tried all different smoking policies. A year ago, we built separately ventilated rooms for smokers, but they were hardly used, so we went smoke-free and it's working out great. We should have gone smoke-free in the first place."

Quoted In:

Killackey, J., "Restaurant owner urges peers to go smoke-free," The Oklahoman, August 28, 2003.


Don Coit, Owner of three Oklahoma restaurants

Coit said he spent $60,000 to add a separate smoking room for each of his three locations, but decided to simply go smokefree after seeing how little the smoking rooms were utilized:

"We tried that for about eight or nine months, and we found that most everybody went into the main part of the dining room. I can't afford to have a place with three people in it when the other room is full."

Quoted In:

English, P., "Eateries told to go smokeless," Tulsa World, August 28, 2003.


D'Anne Coit, Assistant Manager of family-owned restaurant in Oklahoma

"It [going smokefree] hasn't affected sales at all. Our regular smoking customers are still here every day, and if they want to smoke, they go outside."

Quoted In:

English, P., "Eateries told to go smokeless," Tulsa World, August 28, 2003.


Arthur Gregory, Owner of A&M Roadhouse in Tribeca, New York City

"I don't think you can ventilate out the smoke. It [NY's clean indoor air law] hasn't hurt my business that much. I'm happy about the ban because I was waking up three times a week with my lungs hurting from the smoke. You can do what you want at home, but you have no right to kill me or my employees."

Quoted In:

McDonough, F., "Smoking ban is choking biz, says protesters," New York Daily News, July 25, 2003.


George Van Dusen, Mayor, Skokie, IL

Regarding the town's smokefree restaurant ordinance: "I've had some restaurateurs tell me privately they're glad the village board passed it because it takes the issue out of their hands, that they get complaints from waiters and waitresses who don't like to work in smoking sections. They say this will make the place a little more clean."

Quoted In:

Black, L., "Smoking-ban stirs emotions," Chicago Tribune, July 29, 2003.


Joan Desadora, Owner of The Parting Glass bar in Saratoga Springs, New York

Desadora credited the state's new smokefree law with a ten percent increase in her business, as well as assisting her in her efforts to quit smoking, and said, "The government is helping us. I thought I couldn't quit."

Quoted In:

Burdi, J., "With new ban in place, some bar owners say: no smoking, no problem," Saratogian, July 30, 2003.


Jerry Cuozzo, Bartender in New York City

"The Smokefree Air Act benefits both me and my customers. My tips have remained steady, and I no longer come home each night from work with puffy eyes and a sore throat. Just about all of my customers love a smoke-free bar, and now they stay even longer."

Quoted In:

[n.a.], "Employment up in city bars and restaurants since implementation of the Smoke-Free Air Act," New York, NY: New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, Office of Communications, July 23, 2003.


Pat Hughes , Owner, Scruffy Duffy's in New York City

"My health and the health of my employees is simply better since the Smoke Free Air Act went into effect. The best part is that it has not hurt my business' bottom line."

Quoted In:

[n.a.], "Employment up in city bars and restaurants since implementation of the Smoke-Free Air Act," New York, NY: New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, Office of Communications, July 23, 2003.


Bob Lucke, Cascades Restaurant in Hudson, NY

On voluntarily going smokefree: "Business is terrific. I can't say the non-smoking has helped our business, but it hasn't hurt us either."

Quoted In:

Mabb, J., "Tavern owners say rights go up in smoke," The Independent, July 11, 2003.

 




Karen Dennis, Owner, Stuffed Pig, Florida Keys

On the economic impact Florida's smokefree air law: "We haven't noticed any difference. There was no drop off at all."

Quoted In:

Welber, M., "Smoke clears and its business as usual: establishments report little impact from smoking ban," Keynoter, July 9, 2003.

 




Kenton Johnson, CompWellness, Centennial, Colorado

Johnson stated that he had interviewed 75 smokefree restaurants in Denver, Colorado and, "In no case did becoming smoke-free hurt business. In fact, some tracked carefully enough to report increased revenues as well as customer compliments. Smokers simply smoked outside, and enjoyed the atmosphere and food inside."

Quoted In:

Johnson, K., "Smoke-free can be good for business," Denver Business Journal, July 7, 2003.

 




Jose Alcasid, Manager, Keo's In Waikiki, Oahu, HI

Regarding Oahu's smokefree ordinance: "We gained more customers. Sometimes people walked out because they smelled smoke; now they don't smell it and they stay."

Quoted In:

Mitchell, J., "Oahu smoke-free for a year -- no ifs, ands or butts," Pacific Business News, July 7, 2003.

 




Avril Charnley, Owner, Druids Arms Pub, Louisville, CO

Charnley indicated that business increased 25 percent after the city enacted a smokefree ordinance, and said, "It has done us wonderful."

Quoted In:

Neff, T., "Smoking ban's effect foggy," Daily Camera, July 7, 2003.

 




Gary Dominguez, Co-owner, York Harbor Inn, Maine

On voluntarily making the building, guest rooms, bar and restaurant smoke-free:

"We made the decision partly because our building is very hard to treat (for tainted) air because of the low ceilings. We also had a concern for our employees, always having to breathe second-hand smoke. When we first did it, most of our clientele were happy, and most smokers understood. We noticed a tiny drop-off in the pub at first, then business actually increased because it was smoke-free. I think the effect was positive."


Quoted In:

Dandurant, K., "Smoking ban in bars gets applause," Portsmouth Herald, July 1, 2003.

 




David Roland, Manager, Denny's, Rapid City, South Dakota

On a smokefree state law and his work environment: "I do find it more enjoyable to work in." Roland added that sales have increased since going smokefree, as more tourists will now dine at his restaurant.

Quoted In:

Agnelly, C., "Smoke-free law reaches one year anniversary," KOTA Territory News, July 1, 2003.

 




Scott Okamota, General Manager, Chart House, Honolulu

RE: Oahu's smokefree law:

"The workers are happier. Our hair and clothes don't smell like smoke anymore. It hasn't caused any revenue loss for us."

Quoted In:

Bernardo, R., "Smoking ban divides Oahu restaurateurs," Honolulu Star-Bulletin, June 29, 2003.

 




D.K. Kodama, Owner, Sansei Seafood Restaurant & Sushi Bar, Oahu, HI

RE: Oahu's smokefree law:

"It helps business. Now, I don't have to have ashtrays. Now, I don't have to fix any burns or damages from the cigarettes. Everybody can taste our food and smell our food without the smoke."

Quoted In:

Bernardo, R., "Smoking ban divides Oahu restaurateurs," Honolulu Star-Bulletin, June 29, 2003.

 




Dee Haven, Coastal Bend Restaurant Association

Re: smokefree laws:

"It should be up to the owner of the establishment to decide if he wants to allow smoking, but smoke-free environments are doing well."

Quoted In:

Aguilar, E., "Smoke-free impact is vague," Corpus Christi Caller-Times, June 29, 2003.

 




R.B. Langham, Owner of Catfish Charlie's in Corpus Christi, TX

Re: voluntarily going smokefree:

"I should have done this years ago. Customers no longer have to wait for specific seating, so I think business has improved."

Quoted In:

Aguilar, E., "Smoke-free impact is vague," Corpus Christi Caller-Times, June 29, 2003.

 




Erin Ford, Manager of Hugo's in Fayetteville, AR

On a voluntary smokefree policy:

"We have had great business. Sales have gone up because of it. When the single room restaurant allowed patrons to smoke it went everywhere. There have been no complaints since the change."


Quoted In:

Wallworth, A., "Smoke & money," Northwest Arkansas Times, June 29, 2003.

 



Mike Bernstein , Darden Restaurants Inc., Florida

On going smokefree: "Most of the reaction has been positive. It has not affected our business in any way."

Quoted In:

Tanasychuk, J., "Florida's ban on public smoking kicks in on Tuesday," South Florida Sun-Sentinel, June 29, 2003.



Doug Zeif, Owner, Brasserie Las OLas, Fort Lauderdale, FL

On California's smokefree air law: "In Los Angeles, it was rough going for 30 days until people stabilized themselves. The restaurants did fine. New York has been nonsmoking for the better part of 2 1/2 months, and people are adjusting." Zeif, who was working as a consultant to Spark's Steakhouse in Manhattan stated, "Is the atmosphere different? Yes, certainly. Are they packed? Yes. Does the food taste better? Yes. Everything is better without the aroma of smoke."

Quoted In:

Tanasychuk, J., "Florida's ban on public smoking kicks in on Tuesday," South Florida Sun-Sentinel, June 29, 2003.

 




Daniel Delatorre, Owner of the MexiDans restaurant in Denver, Colorado

"Twelve years ago we stopped permitting smoking inside the restaurant. There was a small initial impact, then no problem. This was good for business. It's healthier for workers and patrons, there is faster turnover on tables, and there are no dirty walls or burns."

Quoted In:

Delatorre, D., "Letters to the editor: ban good for business," Rocky Mountain News, June 17, 2003.

 




Rob Farhar, Owner, Bella Lounge, Lawrence, KS

"When we were remodeling in February, people would come up on the street to me and ask, 'Have you ever considered making a non-smoking place?'"

Quoted In:

Kelly, A., "New bar gambles on non-smoking rule," University Daily Kansan, June 11, 2003.

 




Ken Benson, Owner, Olympic Donut, Milford, CT

On going smokefree: "It helped business. All of our regulars stayed."

Quoted In:

Da Costa-Fernandes, M., "Area bars, restaurants ready to snuff out smoking," New Haven Register, June 9, 2003.

 



Patrick Keane , Bartender, Corrib Bar, Boston, MA

On Boston's smokefree air law: "It's a good thing; places are cleaner and healthier. They've got used to it here, and they'll get used to it in Ireland. There's no doubt that Irish people will still go out for a few drinks."

Quoted In:

[n.a.], "Cheers all round for Boston's smoking ban ; With Ireland due to introduce strict anti-smoking laws early next year, Ian Kilroy reports from Boston on how drinkers there are adjusting to the city's new smoke-free policy in pubs," Irish Times, June 7, 2003.




Jon Sweeney , Manager, Cheers, Boston, MA

"Before the law passed a lot of businesses in Boston were afraid of it. But now that it's come into effect and they've seen no drop-off the local business owners are more in favour of it."

Quoted In:

[n.a.], "Cheers all round for Boston's smoking ban ; With Ireland due to introduce strict anti-smoking laws early next year, Ian Kilroy reports from Boston on how drinkers there are adjusting to the city's new smoke-free policy in pubs," Irish Times, June 7, 2003.



Ruth McDonald, Co-owner, Gold Dust Saloon, Pueblo, CO

"Employees got tired of working around second-hand smoke, and of having to clean up cigarette butts littering the floor and sidewalk inside and outside the building. We got tired of customers flicking cigarette ashes in peanut bowls and watching customers, who, because of the cigarette smoke, leave the building moments after they arrived. We have lost some old customers but have gained new customers who can now bring their families without subjecting them to second-hand smoke."

Quoted In:

Dagendesh, W.J., "No-smoking ordinance sees mixed reply from businesses," Business Journal 11(7), June 6, 2003.

 




Tom Eldridge, Owner Tom's Tavern in Boulder, CO

Re: smokefree ordinance:

"I think actually my business increased because of it. People that want to smoke still come in and have dinner, then go outside and have a cigarette."

Quoted In:

Forgrieve, J., "City smoking ban stokes debate," Rocky Mountain News, April 29, 2003.

 




Peter Wright, Owner, Soda Shoppe in Laconia, NH

Regarding voluntarily going smokefree: "I had made this commitment to myself twice before. Each time I decided to do it, I chickened out at the last minute. But the third time, I said, 'That's it, we're going to publicize it, and just do it.' Looking back, the smokers would stay longer, have a cigarette, and linger. Now, they come in, they eat, and they leave."

Quoted In:

Amer, S., "Clearing the air," Restaurant Business Daily, April 18, 2003.

 




Gary Honeycutt, Owner, BJ's Country Kitchen chain in Fresno, CA

Regarding a 1997 smokefree restaurant ordinance: "I was sure my business was going to go down. I had heard all the horror stories, and I listened to the guys at the counter saying they wouldn't come back. And, lo and behold, it went the other way."

Quoted In:

Amer, S., "Clearing the air," Restaurant Business Daily, April 18, 2003.

 




George Folmer, Owner, Dutchman Restaurant, Arkansas

On voluntarily going smokefree: "People would come in and say 'It smells so good in here.' They could smell the food cooking."

Quoted In:

Miller, S., "Restaurant owner touts smoke-free benefits," Baxter Bulletin, April 1, 2003.

 




William Baker, Owner, Dunderbak's, Allentown, Pennsylvania

On voluntarily going smokefree: "We did so with the firm belief that passive cigarette smoke is a carcinogen and that we were endangering the health of our customers, our staff and our family if we continued to allow smoking. We expected an immediate 20 percent drop in sales and hoped that at the end of the first year we would be down no more than 10 percent. We were thrilled when the opposite occurred. As the word spread about our nonsmoking policy, sales soared. Now, a week does not go by without someone thanking me or leaving a comment card thanking us for going nonsmoking."

Quoted In:

Baker, W., "For health and economics, go smoke-free," Morning Call, March 14, 2003.

 


Corby Spruance, Manager, Pan Tai, Wilmington, DE

“Personally, I hope that (HB 15) doesn’t pass. It just happened, people are going to get over it. People already are over it. The few people who complained still come in once a week. It didn’t take that much time. We’ve been doing excellent business. I’ve noticed a lot of people are coming in now because there’s no smoking. Before there were people who didn’t want to deal with the smoke. I’ve not seen any negative effect. I think it is the best thing. It is by far a better work environment. When I used to go out to bars, the smoke didn’t bother me that much. But when you work in it you notice it in a totally different light. Especially bartending. It is very tough. I love working in these conditions, and we have a lot of maintenance we don’t have to worry about. I have nothing but positive things to say about it.”

Quoted In:

[n.a.], "Restaurants oppose efforts to weaken the smoking ban [Phone interviews with IMPACT Coalition]," Breathe Easy Delaware, March 10, 2003.





David Weir, Owner, Buckley’s Tavern, Centreville, DE

“It’s been great for us. Customer feedback has been great. I think I’ve gained business. In the tavern, if there was one guy with a cigar, we couldn’t seat anyone in there. Now it’s easier for me working the door. Any customers who complain, they’re all still here. Not one of them hasn’t come in because of it. It hasn’t hurt us. Employees all talk about going home not smelling like smoke. It’s only been three months. (People who want to change the law) haven’t given it enough time. There’s not enough data. People screaming they are losing their shirts, I can’t believe they were going gangbusters before. The economy has been bad. (Any changes to the law) would have to be fair across the board.”

Quoted In:

[n.a.], "Restaurants oppose efforts to weaken the smoking ban [Phone interviews with IMPACT Coalition]," Breathe Easy Delaware, March 10, 2003.





Virgil Cline, Owner, Farmer's Table, Fort Collins, CO

Regarding a proposed smokefree ordinance: "The reality is that I was in favor because it would increase my business. I anticipate close to a 20 percent increase once we go totally non-smoking." On voluntarily going smokefree during certain times: "When I went non-smoking on the weekends, our business increased drastically and immediately." On potential reaction from smoking customers: "I personally think that you're going to see an attitude change in everybody. Once it settles in, about this time next year, nobody will give smoking, or not smoking, a thought. If they're going to go out to eat, they'll go out to eat."

Quoted In:

Mustari, A., "Fort Collins smoking ordinance causes controversy," Colorado State Collegian, March 7, 2003.

 


Benny Scotto, Owner, Lamberti’s, North Wilmington, DE

“The smoking ban has done no harm at all. I’d say it has probably improved my business. I think they (bars, other restaurants) should just tough it out. It’s new, with time, in a year or two, it will be in the past.”

Quoted In:

[n.a.], "Restaurants oppose efforts to weaken the smoking ban [Phone interviews with IMPACT Coalition]," Breathe Easy Delaware, March 4, 2003.

 




Betsy Leroy, Owner, Pizza By Elizabeth’s, Wilmington, DE

“Stick to it, this is the best. In 10 years we’ve been open, no one has ever come in, found out it was nonsmoking and left. I have never seen an impact. I think once people get used to it, that will be the way it is. My husband had a band ever since he was in high school, still play twice a month. I still go when they play. That was the only thing I hated about it – it was so smoky. I couldn’t stand myself. Now I am more likely to go out.”

Quoted In:

[n.a.], "Restaurants oppose efforts to weaken the smoking ban [Phone interviews with IMPACT Coalition]," Breathe Easy Delaware, March 4, 2003.

 




David Slater, Manager, The Arsenal at Old New Castle, DE

“Keep it in place. Keep it going. Give it some time. We’ve had the worst winter, the economy’s bad, the war. You can’t blame the smoking law. I would hate to see the smoking law suffer because of that. It has actually helped us. Now people come out that didn’t come out before. The people who do smoke are a little inconvenienced, but they’re used to it. A lot of our staff have quit because of it. I think they should give it a little more time before they start changing it.”

Quoted In:

[n.a.], "Restaurants oppose efforts to weaken the smoking ban [Phone interviews with IMPACT Coalition]," Breathe Easy Delaware, March 4, 2003.

 




Bill Brown, Owner, Blue White Grill, Martinsburg, West Virginia

Bill Brown, owner of the Blue White Grill in Martinsburg, West Virginia, had expected a loss of business under a clean indoor air ordinance, but found that, "It increased our business because our table turn is quicker. People just don't linger to smoke. And we have some new customers."

Quoted In:

[n.a.], "Smoking ban helps businesses, study says," Dominion Post, February 18, 2003.

 




Mike Hataway, Manager of Buzzard Billy's, Waco, Texas

Hataway stated that going smokefree has not had a negative economic impact and that the restaurant had decided not to spend $15,000 on a smoking room. Hataway said, "It was just a matter of deciding where to put our money when less than 25 percent of the population smokes. We had received some complaints from nonsmokers and we are trying to be a family restaurant."

Quoted In:

Smith, J.B., "Clearing the air: many Waco restaurants eliminating smoking option," Waco Tribune-Herald, February 9, 2003.

 




Charlie Spencer, Assistant Manager of Marie Callender's, Waco, Texas

On the adding added a smoking section as an experiment, assistant manager Charlie Spencer stated, "It didn't go over well. A lot of people preferred us not to be smoking. We turned away more tables than we kept."

Quoted In:

Smith, J.B., "Clearing the air: many Waco restaurants eliminating smoking option," Waco Tribune-Herald, February 9, 2003.

 




Betty Johnson, Owner of Cupp's Drive Inn, Waco, Texas

On her decision to go smokefree during lunchtime, "No smoking from 11 to 2. When it's that full in such a small place, it bothers too many people. Now, I smoke myself, but I go outside. The nonsmokers like it because they don't like the smell of smoke. The smokers didn't like it, but they still come in."

Quoted In:

Smith, J.B., "Clearing the air: many Waco restaurants eliminating smoking option," Waco Tribune-Herald, February 9, 2003.

 




Helen Bomar, Owner, Subs & Clubs, in Del Rio, Texas

"I think I've actually gained business because of the ban on smoking in my place."

Quoted In:

Sontag, B., "Smoking ban proposed," Del Rio News-Herald, January 23, 2003.

 




Robert Jordon, Former owner of a restaurant in a community with a smokefree ordinance

"What we found when smokers were eliminated was that it increased business, it did not decrease business."

Quoted In:

WSAZ Charleston, "Smoking ban discussed in Kanawha County," MSNBC News, January 15, 2003.

 


Genie Rogers , Gullifty's Restaurant

"A lot of times no one wanted to sit in smoking so the staff there wasn't very busy. Most of my employees are college students who need the tips. They like it that there are no 'bad' sections now. Everyone has a level playing field."


Quoted In:

Kalson, S., "Restaurants say smoking ban buoys bottom line," Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, January 13, 2003.




Michael Casey, President, Hotel & Restaurant Employees, Local 2, AFL-CIO

"The tobacco industry tried to scare our members into thinking their employers would lose business due to the smoking ban, and that they would lose their jobs. I'm proud to say our union members and many employers saw through these tactics and stood up for the right to a safe and healthy workplace. The restaurants, bars and hotels where our members work did not suffer any adverse effects from the smoking ban. If anything, it's been good for business and customers as well as for our members."

Quoted In:

[n.a.], "California's health, labor and business leaders confirm 8-year success of smoke-free workplaces," National Conference on Tobacco or Health, November 20, 2002.

 




Mark Flohn, LaRosa's in Cincinnati, Ohio

Regarding the decision to go smokefree, "I feel we are seating the dining room quicker and turning the dining room faster. The servers love not having smoke in the dining room."

Quoted In:

McNair, J.
, "Restaurants' dilemma: smoking or non?," Cincinnati Enquirer, August 25, 2002.

 




Monte Meier, Owner, four Mazzio's Pizza Restaurants, Columbus, OH

On voluntarily going smokefree: "From a business position, it increases the life of your air conditioning. Just like nicotine gets in lungs and builds up, with restaurant equipment, it takes smoke and runs it across the coils in the machine. It acts like an acid and eventually eats through the coils. Any business that has machinery or computers and cash registers, they last longer if they are in an environment with no smoke at all."

Quoted In:

Ponder, K., "Increasing number of restaurants going smoke-free: Tobacco Free Action Coalition encourages all city restaurants to go nonsmoking," Ledger-Enquirer, July 25, 2002.

 




Ron Blair, Cattleman's Club, South Dakota

On voluntarily going smokefree: "In one month, we had positive comments. It increased our business by quite a bit."

Quoted In:

Charron, A., "New state law banning smoking takes effect Monday," Pierre Capital Journal, June 28, 2002.

 




Rick Strack, Owner of RJ's Cafe, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

"We went smoke-free and business improved, so I cannot begin to imagine how it [Oklahoma's statewide smoking restrictions] would affect nicer restaurants that serve higher volumes of people. Right now people are just afraid of what is going to happen. But my prediction is eight months from now the results will be so tremendous, restaurant people will wonder why they didn't do this sooner."

Quoted In:

[n.a.], "Restaurant owners criticize smoking regulations," NewsOK.com, June 27, 2002.

 




Rayno Seasar, Owner, The Egg and I restaurant chain in Colorado

On voluntarily going smokefree:

"We agonized over it, and it was the best business decision we ever made."

Quoted In:

Olinger, D., "Philip Morris quietly contests Ft. Collins' bid to ban smoking," Denver Post, May 12, 2002.

 




Tate Williams, Vice president of Palm Beach BBQ Inc., which owns four Sonny's Real Pit BBQ restaurants in Florida

Going smokefree has resulted in faster table turnover, happier and healthier employees and better business, says Tate Williams, vice president of Palm Beach BBQ Inc., which owns four Sonny's restaurants from Boynton Beach to Jupiter.

"I think I've encountered only one gentleman who got up and walked out, and if I'm not mistaken, I saw him in the next week," Williams said.

Quoted In:

Martinez, A., "Sonny's smoke-free, vote or no vote," Palm Beach Post, April 22, 2002.

 




Lisa Duprey, Chili's Bar & Grill in New Britain, Connecticut

On going smokefree in the dining room:

"Guests are very happy. When you say 'The whole dining room is non-smoking,' people say, 'That's wonderful.'"

Duprey adds that the policy lets tables be filled quickly, "The smoking section was always the last to fill."

Quoted In:

Lynch, M.A., "Everybody wins with smoke-free dining rooms," Hartford Courant, April 4, 2002.

 




Robert Zittokun, Manager at Piccolo Arcanio in Farmington, Connecticut

"...I'm very happy that the dining rooms are non-smoking. I think it helps revenues."

Quoted In:

Lynch, M.A., "Everybody wins with smoke-free dining rooms," Hartford Courant, April 4, 2002.

 




Jean Freedle, Owner of The Dog House restaurant in High Point, North Carolina

On voluntarily going smokefree:

"I did it mainly out of consideration for customers who don't smoke, like children and people with allergies. But I'm not all altruistic, because it will help me in the turnover of booths. People sit here and have a nice leisurely cigarette, and then another, and there are people standing at both ends waiting for a booth."



Quoted In:

[n.a.], "High Point, N.C., eatery to ban smoking," High Point Enterprise, April 1, 2002.

 




Vicki Maxwell, Manager, Galaxy Lanes in Kanawha City, West Virginia

On the possibility of the local board of health requiring that bowling alleys go smokefree:

"Hallelujah. I have more complaints about smoking. I pray it will be changed."

Quoted In:

Cox, T.S., "Smokers' safe havens may be stamped out: health officials may strengthen ban on public smoking," Charleston Daily Mail, March 20, 2002.

 




Dan Ferguson, Owner, Chef Dan's in Charleston, West Virginia

On customer preferences for the nonsmoking section and the possibility of the local board of health making restaurants smokefree:

"The nonsmoking area fills up first. I'd be happy if the board makes the ordinance stronger."

Quoted In:

Cox, T.S., "Smokers' safe havens may be stamped out: health officials may strengthen ban on public smoking," Charleston Daily Mail, March 20, 2002.

 




Greg Lippert, Senior Vice President, Mazzio's Corp.

Regarding a decision to make several restaurants in the Mazzio's Pizza and Zio's Italian Kitchen chains smokefree:

"For every one complaint, we've gotten ten compliments." Lippert also stated that going smokefree, "has been a positive experience for our many customers, and we belive we're now more of an employer-of-choice for our 5,000 workers." On the economic impact of going smokefree, Lippert stated, "From a financial aspect, none of our restaurants have suffered from a drop in sales because of our smokefree policy."

Quoted In:

Killackey, J., "Mazzio's, Zio's Italian Kitchens ban smoking at state locations," Oklahoman, March 13, 2002.

 




Tom Buxton, CEO of the Skybox, Salt Lake City, UT

"In Salt Lake City, a lot of people don't go into private clubs because of the smoking element. It's not the drinking element they mind. It's just kind of a messy habit, you know, the cigarettes left behind, the butts. There just seems to be a movement underway, people are just tired of it."

Quoted In:

May, H., "No-smoking clubs, downtown bars snug cigarettes in bid to attract more patrons," Salt Lake Tribune, March 4, 2002.

 




Jeffrey S. Ciuffreda, Vice President, Greater Springfield Chamber of Commerce

Regarding a local clean indoor air ordinance in Springfield, Massachusetts: "We feel it has worked out quite well for everyone. It protects the public health and it allowed businesses to make accommodations to their customers that wanted to smoke in their facilities."

Quoted In:

Goonan, P., "Restaurants mark 1 year smoke-free," Union-News, March 3, 2002.

 




Sandra Jacques, Manager, Russell's

Regarding a local clean indoor air ordinance in Springfield, Massachusetts: "A lot of customers really appreciate a smoke-free environment. Myself, I'm enjoying it."

Quoted In:

Goonan, P., "Restaurants mark 1 year smoke-free," Union-News, March 3, 2002.

 




Maura Tobias, Spokesperson for the Friendly's restaurant chain

The Friendly's restaurant in Fall River, Massachusetts, went smokefree after manager Tom Ward noticed a line of customers waiting for tables in the nonsmoking section, despite the fact that tables were open in the smoking section.

Friendly's spokesperson Maura Tobias stated, "It was strictly a business decision." Tobias noted that almost 60 percent of Friendly's restaurants have gone smokefree.

Quoted In:

[n.a.], "Friendly's opts to clear the air," Herald News, February 28, 2002.

 




John Kirkpatrick, Sonny's Barbecue, Florida

This nine-restaurant chain voluntarily went smokefree, following a positive Smoke-Free Dining Day experience in November 2000:

"Last year we enjoyed the greatest sales in all of our stores we've ever had." Kirkpatrick attributes much of those sales to "going smokefree." He adds, "It's been very good for our restaurants. The attitudes by our employees are far better; they really enjoy working in a smokefree environment and our customers appreciate it, too."

Quoted In:

Allen, R., "Please extinguish all smoking materials," Star-Banner, February 19, 2002.

 




Brad Kramble, Owner, Perkins restaurants in Winnipeg, Canada

Regarding a smoking bylaw that makes restaurants open to minors smokefree: "The first week in January was possibly the best week we had for the last 53 weeks here. We are up, considerably up — going into Saturday I was up eight-and-a-half, almost ten percent [at the Pembina location], and probably about five percent over at the Transcona store."

Quoted In:

[n.a.], "Smoking ban improves business: restaurateur," CBC News, January 8, 2002.

 




Joyce Brown, Owner of Blue and White Grill, Martinsburg, West Virginia

“I anticipated that our business would have declined because we had a lot of smokers but we have actually seen a continued growth in our business. We have lost a few of our smokers but the non-smokers have made up for them. Our social atmosphere has changed somewhat since people don’t linger as long to smoke a cigarette.”

Quoted In:

[n.a.], "Business impact in West Virginia: what restaurant owners are saying about being smoke free...," Smoke-Free WV, 2002.

 




Tom Graham, Manager, Outback Steak House, Martinsburg, WV

“The first week we had a few upset customers but after that it’s been like smoke free has been the norm. Business continues to increase and we’ve seen a 2% increase in overall sales and that’s a lot of money. One customer was upset that we no longer had to provide matches and he collects them."

Quoted In:

[n.a.], "Business impact in West Virginia: what restaurant owners are saying about being smoke free...," Smoke-Free WV, 2002.

 




Shirley Kinney, Owner, Shirley’s Restaurant, Romney, WV

"We’ve never had any problems with being smoke free, all the restaurants had to do it so everyone just accepted it. Business is still busy and I don’t think anyone even thinks about it any more. It helped that everyone had to do the same in the county so no one really had an advantage one way or another."

Quoted In:

[n.a.], "Business impact in West Virginia: what restaurant owners are saying about being smoke free...," Smoke-Free WV, 2002.

 




Jim Summers, Manager, Fazoli’s Family Restaurant, Martinsburg, WV

“Sales have not declined, they basically have stayed the same. Employees are the most upset that they have to go outside and can’t smoke as much now."

Quoted In:

[n.a.], "Business impact in West Virginia: what restaurant owners are saying about being smoke free...," Smoke-Free WV, 2002.

 




Dee Atkinson, Owner, Poky Dot Restaurant, Fairmont WV

“After taking over a family restaurant that allowed smoking for over forty years it was a very difficult decision to become smoke free but if we had to do it all over again, we will still choose smoke free. Business has been good and we don’t have the damage from the smoke. It would help though if they would pass it for everyone in the county so we don’t look like the bad guys.”

Quoted In:

[n.a.], "Business impact in West Virginia: what restaurant owners are saying about being smoke free...," Smoke-Free WV, 2002.

 




Randy Watson, Manager, Warm Springs Eatery, Martinsburg, WV

“There has been no difference in business, we hear complaints either way. Business for us has always been good ."

Quoted In:

[n.a.], "Business impact in West Virginia: what restaurant owners are saying about being smoke free...," Smoke-Free WV, 2002.

 




Craig Thompson, Manager, Korner Shop Café, Franklin, WV

“We decided to go smoke free with the old regulation that was 50/50 and it hasn’t hurt us at all. We have always been real busy and I haven’t heard any threats from smokers not to return. They just go outside."

Quoted In:

[n.a.], "Business impact in West Virginia: what restaurant owners are saying about being smoke free...," Smoke-Free WV, 2002.

 




Pat Kilmer, Owner, Barney’s Restaurant Martinsburg, WV

“Actually, our lunch business has really increased. We don’t give out as many refills because smokers don’t linger as long. We have regulars that come to play keno and the video machines because we are smoke free. But all in all it hasn’t been that bad. The employees are the most upset because they have to go outside.”

Quoted In:

[n.a.], "Business impact in West Virginia: what restaurant owners are saying about being smoke free...," Smoke-Free WV, 2002.

 




Regina Spinella, La Trattoria Italian Eatery, Martinsburg, WV

“Everything has been pretty good. I was actually glad to see the regulation come. In the beginning, a few people threatened to go across the nearby state border but they are still coming now. Busy is a little busier right now. I love this thing, the smell is gone!”

Quoted In:

[n.a.], "Business impact in West Virginia: what restaurant owners are saying about being smoke free...," Smoke-Free WV, 2002.

 




Shellene Reed, Manager, Memphis Bar BQ Co., WV

“Sales were not affected, the nonsmokers definitely increased, it's very rarely that someone gets mad and leaves. They just go outside and smoke and come back in. The smokers still visit the bar and have their drinks and then step outside.”

Quoted In:

[n.a.], "Business impact in West Virginia: what restaurant owners are saying about being smoke free...," Smoke-Free WV, 2002.

 




Mary Kay Snider, Kady’s Restaurant and Katering, Romney, WV

“We’ve had our regulation for over four years and business is even better. We don’t hear any complaints or compliments because no one really remembers when smoking was permitted. None of my employees smoke but I do and it doesn’t even bother me to go outside, I smoke less."

Quoted In:

[n.a.], "Business impact in West Virginia: what restaurant owners are saying about being smoke free...," Smoke-Free WV, 2002.

 




Claudia, Owner, Mary’s Restaurant, Kingwood, WV

“We’ve not noticed any difference in sales, people still come either way. My wait staff is pretty happy about breathing better though, especially the cleaning lady because there is less to do now."

Quoted In:

[n.a.], "Business impact in West Virginia: what restaurant owners are saying about being smoke free...," Smoke-Free WV, 2002.

 




Jennie, Owner, Maxwell’s Restaurant, Morgantown, WV

“We picked up a few more nonsmokers and may have lost a few smokers so it has basically evened out. We kind of forget about being nonsmoking now, it’s the norm around here."

Quoted In:

[n.a.], "Business impact in West Virginia: what restaurant owners are saying about being smoke free...," Smoke-Free WV, 2002.

 




Jim Maier, Owner, Monroe’s Restaurant, Kingwood, WV

“Regardless of what my personal beliefs are about the regulation, it was obviously a good business move to become smoke free."

Quoted In:

[n.a.], "Business impact in West Virginia: what restaurant owners are saying about being smoke free...," Smoke-Free WV, 2002.

 




Claire Laurita, Owner, Sammie’s Italian Eartery, Morgantown, WV

“Business has been great! I didn’t realize until we went smoke free how many people hated smoke, including me. For the few smokers I may have lost, I doubled them in non-smokers. Business is a lot better now since we went smoke free. Without the smoke the place isn’t as dirty and you can actually smell the food!"

Quoted In:

[n.a.], "Business impact in West Virginia: what restaurant owners are saying about being smoke free...," Smoke-Free WV, 2002.

 




Ted Parks, Owner, The Barrio, Tucson, Arizona

"We were completely against the city passing the ordinance. We felt that individual businesses should make that decision. But in up to two or three months, I had 90 percent of my guests say they enjoyed the restaurant much better now that there is no smoking.... If the ordinance were to be rescinded, we would continue to be nonsmoking."

Quoted In:

Sanders, B., "Restaurant smoking ban on county agenda," Arizona Daily Star, October 7, 2001.

 




David McCarty, Bartender at the Rose & Crown, Delaware

"For a couple of weeks business slacked off, but now people are coming back. Now, I'd say our business has doubled."

Quoted In:

Jackson, P., "State's proposed smoking ban hailed, snubbed," Delaware News Journal, August 20, 2001.

 




Joe Volpe, Restaurateur in Nashua, New Hampshire

"As an eating establishment owner, we’ve instituted a no-smoking ban in our restaurant since opening eight months ago, and 95 percent to 99 percent of our customers are very satisfied with our decision. We have increased our dining room capacity since."


Quoted In:

Volpe, J., "Letters: smokers have amazing excuses," Telegraph Online, August 18, 2001.

 




Jarrett Van Ness, Manager, Tailgaters Bar & Grill in Corvallis, Oregon

Describing the economic impact of Corvallis' smokefree bars ordinance: "It's had absolutely no negative effect on us. It's the best thing that ever happened to us. The people who work in the bar atmosphere don't have to spend eight hours covered in smoke. We've actually gained customers because of it. I feared the worst because, at the time, I was a smoker, too."

Quoted In:

Welch, B., "Bob Welch: life goes on without smoke," Register-Guard, July 1, 2001.

 




Mary Maddy, Manager of Marie Callender's, Eugene, Oregon

"We didn't really have that big of a problem. We had very few people coming in saying, 'We'll go somewhere else to smoke.' It seems like most people have accepted it more or less now." Maddy added that the restaurant's bar area has been busier since going smokefree, "People will eat in there now who wouldn't even go in there before."

Quoted In:

Maben, S., "Smoking ban fines about to kick in," Register-Guard, June 28, 2001.

 




Chris Otto, General manager of Sweetwater's Restaurant at the Valley River Inn, Eugene, Oregon

"The general response has been fantastic. People have been very happy to see this come about. It's not been without any negative comments, but the negative comments are purely educational in nature. Once we explain what's going on, people tend to accept it." Otto added that, in regards to the city's upcoming clean indoor air ordinance, "We firmly believe it may enhance our business."

Quoted In:

Maben, S., "Smoking ban fines about to kick in," Register-Guard, June 28, 2001.

 




William Styring, III, Senior fellow with the Hudson Institute

Styring conducted an economic analysis study on behalf of Smokefree Indiana, which found that a clean indoor air ordinance in Fort Wayne had no negative economic impact on local restaurants. Styring, a smoker himself, stated, "If the answer was that the restaurant industry had been hurt by that, we were going to print that. I looked as hard as I could to find evidence the other way. It just wasn't there."

Quoted In:

Griner, D., "Study: smoking law doesn't eat profits," Journal Gazette, June 28, 2001.

 




Peter Schumacher, Owner of the Buckeye Roadhouse in Mill Valley, California

"Initially, I thought it [California's smokefree bar law] was an intrusion in someone's business privacy. But it actually hasn't affected business ... it's surprising and even scary how quickly people adapted to it. . . It's amazing how you can change a population of 30-million people."

Quoted In:

Kaufmann, B., "Whiff of future from California," Calgary Sun, June 4, 2001.

 




Lindsey Smith, Manager of the Bubble Lounge in San Francisco, California

"People are so used to not smoking in the clubs. Everyone's so happy to be able to go out and not reek of smoke."

Quoted In:

Kaufmann, B., "Whiff of future from California," Calgary Sun, June 4, 2001.

 




Trevor Johnson, General manager of the Broken Drum Brew Pub
in San Rafael, Marin County

"(The law) doesn't seem to have had that much of a detrimental effect on business." Johnson notes that people were upset for the first six months to a year, and adds, "but they got used to it ... it's not something people think about now."

Quoted In:

Kaufmann, B., "Whiff of future from California," Calgary Sun, June 4, 2001.

 




Lois McGary, Owner, Lois' Place, Grand Junction, Colorado

"Every day I get comments from customers about how nice it is that we're a smoke-free restaurant now. People even write it on their tickets. They come right out and say 'thank you' to me for going smoke-free."

Quoted In:

[n.a.], "Smoke-free air is safe for everyone and enjoyed by all," Grand Junction Daily Sentinel, May 31, 2001.

 




Dan Zambrano, Owner, Conchita's Authentic Mexican Food, Orchard Mesa, Grand Junction, Colorado

"Being smoke-free has been beneficial to my business and our employees. Having a smoke-free restaurant has encouraged by employees to quit smoking. Now only one employee out of 15 smokes. We're known for being a nice, clean restaurant."

Quoted In:

[n.a.], "Smoke-free air is safe for everyone and enjoyed by all," Grand Junction Daily Sentinel, May 31, 2001.

 




Harley Rudofsky, Owner, Crystal Cafe and Bake Shop, Grand Junction, Colorado

"Many people come to our restaurant because we are smoke-free. It's also good for our employees."

Quoted In:

[n.a.], "Smoke-free air is safe for everyone and enjoyed by all," Grand Junction Daily Sentinel, May 31, 2001.



“We’re really happy with the ban,” said Mark Prosen, Applebee’s general manager. The restaurant receives at least 20 notes a week from customers praising the smoke-free atmosphere, Prosen said.

Quoted in:

B. Helgeson, “Smoke-free intentions,” Duluth News Tribune, May 31, 2001.

 




Biran Coulson, Owner, Sigee's Restaurant, in Duluth, Minnesota

Coulson stated that his restaurant's April 2001 business increased almost 40 percent compared to April 2000, and attributed some of this to the town's clean indoor air ordinance. "We've had comments both ways. Some people who really have to smoke will go outside after they order their meals. But I think generally it has been a positive thing."

Quoted In:

Helgeson, B., "Ban gets mixed reviews," Duluth News Tribune, May 30, 2001.

 




Richard Echevarria, Manager of the Adobe Cafe in New Braunfels, Texas

"I think we are getting more repeat business now. We only had six or eight smoking tables and they were right next to nonsmoking tables. I think the change has been received very well."

Quoted In:

Croteau, R., "Eateries split over smoking ban," San Antonio Express-News, May 1, 2001.

 




Mayte Gonzales, Manager of El Nopalito in New Braunfels, Texas

"I had a couple of people say they are not going to come back, but just two. We're busier than before, and a lot of people say they are glad about the ban."

Quoted In:

Croteau, R., "Eateries split over smoking ban," San Antonio Express-News, May 1, 2001.

 




Kevin O'Leary, Owner of O'Leary's Pub and Grill

Regarding a decision to voluntarily go smokefree, O'Leary said, "It hasn't slowed me down one iota. People have come up and thanked me. Come in here Friday around 6 p.m. and you'll see business is pretty good."

Quoted In:

Wood, S., "Report targets smoke in eateries," Albany Times Union, April 20, 2001.

 




Stan Zemler, President of the Boulder, Colorado, Chamber of Commerce

Regarding a Boulder, Colorado, clean indoor air ordinance: "Initially, a couple of businesses may have been affected. But our restaurant and bar business is so vital that I think it actually made it stronger."

Quoted In:

Sovak, K., "Clearing the air: restaurant owners divided over no smoking issue," Minot Daily News Online, March 28, 2001.

 




Debbie Ferretti, Manager of Nello's Cafe, Ashland, Massachusetts

Ferretti indicated that her business improved after Ashland passed a smokefree restaurant ordinance, "We feel like it's done better. We get lots of comments from people who say they wouldn't come in when it was smoking." Ferretti added that the cafe's employees were also pleased, "Everyone seems much happier not to have to work around smoke."

Quoted In:

Hillman, M., "Study finds business goes up when smoking banned," Townonline.com, March 28, 2001.

 




Michael Blastos, Mayor, City of Keene, New Hampshire

Blastos stated that when he made his restaurant smokefree, business increased by 14 percent, and added, "It's only a matter of time before someone sues over the loss of a loved one or files a worker compensation claim over the health effects of second-hand smoke suffered in a restaurant."

Quoted In:

Fahey, T., "Health officials urge smoking ban passage," Union Leader & New Hampshire Sunday News, March 27, 2001.

 




Dave Ruble, Owner, Dave's Home Cooked Foods

On why he made his restaurant smokefree: "It [newspaper article on secondhand smoke] made me think that I could be making someone sick, and that’s wrong. . . These people trust me that I’ll make good food and not make them sick." On the economic impact of his decision: "We've had a tremendous increase on the weekends. People constantly say, 'Hey, Dave, thanks. We appreciate it.'"

Quoted In:

Shockman, L., "Restaurants clear the air on smoking," Toledo Blade, March 4, 2001.

 



Gay Landry, Owner, Landry's Restaurant in New Orleans, Louisiana

"I recommend becoming smokefree for a number of reasons. First, studies have shown that employees in a smokefree environment have less sick days. Second, the building requires less maintenance and painting. Third, by going smokefree we contribute to a higher quality of eating and life."

Quoted In:

[n.a.], "Interview: Gay Landry of Landry's Restaurant, Metairie, LA - a smoke-free establishment," Louisiana Tobacco Control Program Newsletter 3(3): 2, Fall, 2001.


Jim Hruska , Owner, Dam Cafe, Minnesota

On how business has been since going smokefree: "We've had all we can handle. We're running out of pie at night, and it's just running us like crazy."

Quoted In:

Sailor, J., "Gone smokeless," Mankato Free Press, May 31, 2001.


John Douglas , General Manager, Old Country Buffet

"It keeps your restaurant clean. I think we have better guest counts because we are non-smoking. People are free to sit anywhere in the restaurant."

Quoted In:

Sailor, J., "Smoke comes under fire," Mankato Free Press, March 1, 2001.

 


Romelle Jones , Art's Cafe

"Business is great at Art's Cafe. People put their cigarettes out as they enter and some light up as they go out the door, but the air inside, where people are eating and working is clean. We have had many compliments and 'thanks' since our startup date of May 1, 2000."

Quoted In:

Jones, R., "[Letter to the editor]," Morrison County Record, January 1, 2001.



Mike Morton, Brigantine Restaurant, San Diego, CA

“I was in favor of it, a number of my friends in the business were nervous about it, thought it was a good idea, but were nervous about it, and some were opposed to it, flat out opposed to it, said it would kill my business. Well, it didn’t kill anyone’s business.”

“I’m not going to say our business increased but I guarantee it didn’t decrease, it had, it was a positive not a negative.”

“Smoke leaves a yellow film on everything. In our restaurants with lighter colors in some of the dining rooms and so on we would find in wallpaper or paint or whatever, we’d find ourselves having to resurface these areas on a fairly frequent basis. From a cleaning standpoint, from an air conditioning standpoint, a filter standpoint, a smell standpoint, it’s been a positive all the way around. Taste and smell are very closely associated and having the smoke in the restaurant detracts from the dining experience.”

Quoted In:

[n.a.], "Secondhand Smoke In Restaurants: A Search for Solutions," KIISS (Kids Involuntarily Inhaling Secondhand Smoke), 2001.

 




Beverly Mascari, Anthony’s Fish Grottos, San Diego, CA

“Having a separate smoking and non smoking section is a nice thing in theory but the problem is the borders or the barrier between smoking and nonsmoking is non-existent. First of all where do you make the break, will you have more smokers tonight or more non-smokers tonight. Where do you make that, that devisor um where are you going to put your large parties, are your large parties going to be in non smoking or smoking. There’s all kinds of aspects that are totally eliminated when you don’t have smoking in a restaurant.”

"I think the media made more of a big deal about it than it really was."

“They still come in droves, they still love the seafood. We have no more burn holes in the upholstery, or the carpet. When you walk in your place in the morning it smells like food, it doesn’t smell like smoke.”

“We want our young people as well as our elderly people to feel really comfortable. A child with asthma or a child with some kind of, ah, breathing problems, they can feel comfortable going to any place with their family. Whereas before they would have to be excluded from that. We love having families in our restaurant because your introducing to young people the idea of dining out."

“You know, for once government did something that was not only good for the people but it was good for business as well.”

Quoted In:

[n.a.], "Secondhand Smoke In Restaurants: A Search for Solutions," KIISS (Kids Involuntarily Inhaling Secondhand Smoke), 2001.

 




Ruben Villavicencio, The Whole Enchilada, Placentia, CA

“It never worked, only because of the fact that you can’t contain the smoke in one area. If you were to put a barrier, um, in your restaurant then fine then you could contain it, but the fact of the matter is that, take this restaurant, it’s an 80-seater and, uh, if I took 50% of my restaurant the ones that are sitting right next—how do you contain the smoke? You can’t.”

“Well, from an economic standpoint I don’t believe that there was any economic loss that we could determine at all. In other words that, ah, initially certainly we may have seen a slight fallout, it may have been for a month that we might have seen a slight fallout, but once the, the, our customer got accustomed to the fact that again they couldn’t go in anyplace and smoke then they were just resigned to the fact that they’d have to go outside to smoke.”

“We don’t have to remodel as often because the restaurant will stay a lot cleaner. Your drapes don’t have to be cleaned as often and so there are some pluses to that that you don’t realized until later that, in fact, really work to your advantage.”

“You never know who you’re going to be sitting next to. If somebody is in fact highly allergic to, ah, a smoker and they have a problem with asthma, we don’t know that when we sit them down and so that’s eliminated all those types of issues.”

"Since this issue has been resolved in the state of California I think those that said it would ruin their business are still in business. It may have changed their nature in some way, but you know what? Business changes and so you have to adapt to its changes. I believe that it’s only a matter of time before the rest of the nation will be doing exactly what California has done."

Quoted In:

[n.a.], "Secondhand Smoke In Restaurants: A Search for Solutions," KIISS (Kids Involuntarily Inhaling Secondhand Smoke), 2001.

 




Joan Compton, Owner, Compton's, Sarasota Springs, Florida

On the decision to go smokefree: "It's a small space. When we had a smoking section, some people would walk in, see the cloud of smoke and walk back out. We may have lost a small amount of business, but we've gained business in other areas - people come in with their children now. It's made business better, and we're happy we did it."

Quoted In:

Brehm, P., "Area restaurants saying no to nicotine," The Saratogian, December 10, 2000.

 




Dave Barker, Owner, Bailey's, Sarasota Springs, Florida

On the decision to go smokefree: "We wanted this place to be different, to attract a different clientele from the smoky barroom scene. We had reservations about being a nonsmoking establishment, and I had other bar owners tell me that I'd never make it, but it's become our major selling point. It's definitely a forward-looking trend."

Quoted In:

Brehm, P., "Area restaurants saying no to nicotine," The Saratogian, December 10, 2000.

 




Susan Jacquart, Operator of the Four Inns restaurant in Minnesota

Regarding going smokefree: "I wanted to do it years ago, but we decided to wait until the skyway was reopened. We've lost a couple of regulars, but most of the other smokers don't mind. The response has been wonderful; it smells so much better in here."

Quoted In:

Kimball, J., "Pair of life-size butler statues mark University Club," Star Tribune, November 3, 2000.

 




Mark and Dee Johnson, Owners of Schlotzky's Deli in Aurora, Colorado

"Schlotzky's Deli is a family restaurant that opened in 1996. We do not permit smoking on the premises and have experienced a less-expensive operating environment. Restaurants receive more wear and tear in a week than a house receives in its lifetime. No-smoking policies prevent further damage and reduce insurance premiums. We are convinced that our smoke-free environment is an asset to the business."

Quoted In:

Johnson, M. Johnson, D., "Letters to the editor: up in smoke?," Aurora Sentinel, October 6, 2000.

 




Craig Bird, Manager of a Kentucky Fried Chicken in Aurora, Colorado

"We became smoke-free nine years ago. It was a difficult decision to make. We all fear losing our smoking customers. After going smoke-free, our business has experienced a greatly improved environment and much less damage to furniture. I am happy with my choice and it has not caused me any economic hardship."

Quoted In:

Bird, C., "Letters to the editor: me, too," Aurora Sentinel, October 6, 2000.

 




Jay Torres, Co-owner of Blimpie's in Aurora, Colorado

"Our Blimpie's location does not permit smoking on the premises and it has been good for business. Smokers understand, tables turn faster and there is no cigarette damage."

Quoted In:

Torres, J., "Letters to the editor: and me," Aurora Sentinel, October 6, 2000.

 




Dismas Padilla, Manager of a Chick-fil-A in Aurora, Colorado

"We became smoke-free in part because it is mall policy, smoke is nasty, and I want to protect young children. The business has experienced a cleaner environment and less damage. We want to see a smoke-free standard because nonsmokers have rights and there is no need to smoke in public places."

Quoted In:

Padilla, D., "Letters to the editor," Aurora Sentinel, October 6, 2000.

 




Tom Van Tassel, Owner, Tom's Family Restaurant in Toledo, Ohio

On choosing to go smokefree: "There weren't enough smokers clamoring for seats to justify saving some for them. From the logistics standpoint, it didn't make sense to me. I wish I would have done it sooner, I anguished about it for one or two years because I feared repercussions."

Quoted In:

Shockman, L., "Lucas health chief wants county to be smoke-free: proposal targets all public facilities," Toledo Blade, September 29, 2000.

 




Glynn Allen, Owner, Bee Gee's

"It's been going wonderful... For me it was a good move." Allen added that his sales increased from new customers after going smokefree last year.

Quoted In:

[n.a.], "Studies show restaurants benefit without smoking," Central Point Times, August 30, 2000.

 




Dawn Pendleton, Owner, Brite Spot

Brite Spot owner Dawn Pendleton said that going smokefree was an overwhelming success: "I don't think the no-smoking policy has bothered us at all. If anything, customers have been saying 'thank-you'."

Quoted In:

[n.a.], "Studies show restaurants benefit without smoking," Central Point Times, August 30, 2000.


Mark Fulton , Owner, Mr. Pizza, Minnesota

"It's just awesome. Families say they plan on coming in more often now."

Quoted In:

Shockman, L., "Restaurant goes smoke-free," Rochester Post-Bulletin, February 12, 2000.

 




Sheila Langmeyer, Richard's Cafe

"Business has not been hurting... I think it's a little happier."

Quoted In:

Golden, P., "Smoke clears in Framingham, Natick," MetroWest Daily News, January 4, 2000.

 




Tom Agosta, General Manager, The Traffic Jam & Snug, Detroit, Michigan

"Since the Traffic Jam & Snug has become a smoke-free restaurant, we have received nothing but cheers from our customers and have experienced no decline in business."

Quoted In:

[n.a.], "The dollars (and sense) benefits of having a smoke-free workplace," Michigan Department of Community Health, [2000].

 




Joann Noto, Owner, Noto's, Grand Rapids, Michigan

"Our family is very happy to have chosen to keep Noto's completely smoke-free. When guests walk in our restaurant or banquet rooms they smell the flavors coming from the kitchen - not yesterday's stale smoke. There is a lot less maintenance in operating Noto's smoke-free. The walls, carpet, window sheers, etc. remain clean and fresh. Most guests walk into Noto's and request a non-smoking section. We reply with: 'That's no problem because we are a completely non-smoking establishment.' You should hear all of the positive comments."

Quoted In:

[n.a.], "The dollars (and sense) benefits of having a smoke-free workplace," Michigan Department of Community Health, [2000].

 




Kurt Kwiatkowski, Manager, The State Room, Kellogg Center, Lansing, Michigan

"Smoke-free dining has helped us cut our costs and keep our renovated dining area in great condition. We haven't had to repair or replace the carpeting due to odors or burn marks. Our guests love it, and we can really showcase all the flavors of our new menus without the interference of smoke."

Quoted In:

[n.a.], "The dollars (and sense) benefits of having a smoke-free workplace," Michigan Department of Community Health, [2000].

 




Doug Mills, Owner, State Stop Restaurant, Stockbridge, Michigan

"Going smoke-free is the best competitive move I have ever made. I'll never go back to smoking in my restaurant."

Quoted In:

[n.a.], "The dollars (and sense) benefits of having a smoke-free workplace," Michigan Department of Community Health, [2000].

 




Barbara J. Kroll, Owner, Jesperson's, Petoskey, Michigan

"As the owner-operator of a family style restaurant which has been operated by my family for 93 years, I would like to share with you a recent health incident. For nearly two years, I was plagued with constant bronchial infections and breathing problems. After months of antibiotics, I received no relief. In my frustration I went to Mayo Clinic for an examination. They determined that most of my problems were caused by secondhand smoke in our restaurant. Because of this diagnosis we went completely smoke-free in the restaurant. Since implementing this policy in April, 1996, I have had no infections, no antibiotics, and I feel great. The additional benefit of this program has been the overwhelming support of our customers. Over the last few years we had lost customers for no apparent reason. They have returned to us and thanked us for going smoke-free. Going smoke-free has helped both our health and our bottom line."

Quoted In:

[n.a.], "The dollars (and sense) benefits of having a smoke-free workplace," Michigan Department of Community Health, [2000].

 




Steve DiMillo, Owner, DiMillo's Floating Restaurant

"It's great. It's one easier way to do business."

Quoted In:

Pacillo, C., "Butt break: most restaurant owners report no problem," Casco Bay Weekly, January 21, 1999.

 




Susan J.M. Bauman, Mayor, City of Madison, Wisconsin

"In fact, the Madison restaurant business is booming. Many new and high quality restaurants are opening all of the time. ... In fact, I am so pleased with how the smoke free restaurant ordinance has turned out that I am now sponsoring a proposal for a more general 100% smoke free workplace and public accommodations ordinance."

Quoted In:

Bauman, S.J.M., "[Letter to Ira Sharenow re: economic impact of smokefree restaurant ordinance]," Madison, WI: City of Madison, Office of the Mayor, September 8, 1998.

 




Unnamed restaurant owner

"There's less waiting time for tables because all are available to nonsmokers." The owner reported a 5% increase in business following the implementation of California's AB 13.

Quoted In:

[n.a.], "Cutting through the smoke with A.B. 13," Up Front: 6, May/June, 1995.

 




Jerry Reiss, San Luis Obispo Councilman

"Restaurant and hotel sales tax receipts for the first two quarters of 1991 (after adoption of the Ordinance in August of 1990) were actually higher by 7.6% when compared to sales tax receipts for this same category during the first two quarters of 1990 (prior to adoption of the Ordinance).

Quoted In:

Reiss, J., "[Letter to Mayor Tom Bradley re: San Luis Obispo's experience with its clean indoor air ordinance]," San Luis Obispo: City of San Luis Obispo, March 9, 1992.