50th Anniversary of 1964 Sur. Gen. Report

 

January 11, 2014 marks the 50th anniversary of the first Surgeon General's report on Smoking and Health. The 1964 report was the first comprehensive compilation of research linking cigarette smoking to severe adverse health effects. Today, and throughout the year, we celebrate the victories that have occurred since the release of this landmark report, as well as acknowledge ongoing challenges and gaps in protections and the course that we will chart to ensure that everyone lives and works in a smokefree environment, that no one picks up the smoking habit and subsequent nicotine addiction, and that no one has to needlessly suffer from a smoking- or secondhand smoke-related disease.

Michael Terry, son of former Surgeon General Luther Terry,
speaking at the press conference on January 8, 2014

photo of 50th Anniversary Surgeon Generals Report event

(L-R) Robin Koval and Amber Bullock (Legacy), Acting SG Boris Lushniak, Cynthia Hallett (Americans for Nonsmokers' Rights), and Sharon Eubanks at the White House press conference on the release of the Surgeon General's Report.

News & Press Releases | Related Research

The Health Consequences of Smoking - 50 Years of Progress: A Report of the Surgeon General
SurgeonGeneral.gov - [January 21, 2014]

This Executive Summary provides an overview of the full report of the Surgeon General and highlights the conclusions and findings. This comprehensive report chronicles the devastating consequences of 50 years of tobacco use in the United States.

Still a long way to ban smoking
Deccan Herald - January 21, 2014

Fifty years ago this month, Dr Luther L Terry issued the first Surgeon General's Report on Smoking and Health, which cited smoking as a cause of lung cancer ...

TRANSCRIPT: What’s the state of smoking in America?
PBS - January 12, 2014

...BORIS LUSHNIAK: Well, we’re currently working closely, the office of the Surgeon general is working closely with the Food and Drug Administration, specifically the Center for Tobacco Products and are reanalyzing the whole row of the idea of the warning ...

Message from Kathleen Sebelius (PDF)
US Surgeon General Site (DHHS) - January 12, 2014

...We can prevent the staggering toll that tobacco takes on individuals, families, and communities. This new Surgeon General’s report focuses on cigarettes ... Tobacco prevention and control efforts need to be commensurate with the harm caused by tobacco ...

Stop-smoking battle, struggling even after a half century
The Utah People's Post - January 12, 2014

About 50 years ago, on Jan. 11, 1964 the surgeon general declared the health perils connected to smoking. Despite the laws, advertising bans, ...

Stop-smoking battle still raging 50 years after surgeon general ...
Deseret News - January 11, 2014

More than four in 10 American adults were smokers — and so were a lot ... American Lung Association; Americans for Nonsmokers' Rights; and ...

Tobacco and health: Where theres smoke
The Economist - January 11, 2014

t was the report that showed, without a whiff of doubt, that cigarettes kill. On January 11th 1964a Saturday, so to not roil the stockmarketSurgeon-General Luther Terry released a 387-page document entitled Smoking and Health. Ten scientists (all men; half smokers) analysed 7,000 studies to assess the effects of tobacco on the human body. Its conclusions were incendiary. Cigarette smoking is causally related to lung cancer in men, it said. (The data for women, it added, point in the same direction.)

Inquirer Editorial: New fronts in tobacco fight
Philly.com - January 10, 2014

A half-century after the historic U.S. surgeon general's finding that smoking sickens and kills, the Philadelphia region could be viewed as one of the nation's key battlegrounds in the continuing struggle to stem the health scourge, which leads to 443,000 deaths a year and costs billions of dollars in medical care and lost productivity.

100 Years Of Smoking Studies In Popular Science
Popular Science - January 10, 2014

Fifty years ago, the U.S. surgeon general first declared that smoking tobacco causes lung cancer. Popular Science readers could have known that was coming.

The 50-year war on smoking
Los Angeles Times - January 10, 2014

The 1964 U.S. Surgeon General's report on smoking the first official acknowledgment by the federal government that smoking kills was an extraordinarily progressive document for its time. It swiftly led to a federal law that restricted tobacco advertising and required the now-familiar warning label on each pack of cigarettes. The growing body of evidence bolstered important policies to combat tobacco use and the injury to nonsmokers barraged by the damaging effects of secondhand smoke. It can be hard for young Californians today to fathom that smoking was once practically ubiquitous throughout government buildings, restaurants and workplaces. In the 1970s, during hearings on legislation to curb smoking in public buildings, some legislators puffed away even as speakers described the asthma attacks they sometimes suffered from secondhand smoke. New restrictions helped smokers as well; if they could do without a cigarette for hours at a time at their jobs, many discovered, they could do without them entirely. Push for indoor-smoking restrictions in all states. It may surprise Californians, who now face smoking bans in parks, open eating areas and beaches, to learn that some states lack smoking bans even in workplaces, bars and restaurants. Kentucky, for example, restricts smoking only in government and university buildings.

Smoking Bans And Car-Seat Bribes: Five Lessons From The 50-Year Effort to Reduce Smoking and Save Lives
Forbes - January 10, 2014

Fifty years ago this week, Surgeon General Luther Terry released perhaps the most important public health document in U.S. history, the now-famous first Surgeon Generals Report on Smoking and Health. It made explicit and public what virtually every scientist not on the payroll of the tobacco companies knew and acknowledged: that smoking cigarettes was deadly

Fitful Progress in the Antismoking Wars
New York Times - January 9, 2014

Fifty years ago this Saturday, on Jan. 11, 1964, a myth-shattering surgeon generals report on smoking and health brushed aside years of obfuscation by tobacco companies and asserted, based on 7,000 scientific articles, that smoking caused lung cancer and was linked to other serious diseases. Those findings expanded as more data was gathered.

Public health agencies set new goal for reducing smoking
Winston-Salem Journal - January 9, 2014

Seven national public health-advocacy groups have set a goal of reducing adult smoking from 18 percent to below 10 percent by 2024 through actions by Congress, state and local government entities. The groups are the American Academy of Pediatrics, American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network, American Heart Association, American Lung Association, Americans for Nonsmokers Rights, Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids and Legacy. ...

Progress slow, steady as Americans fight to stop smoking
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette January 8, 2014

Fifty years ago this Saturday, U.S. Surgeon General Luther Terry dropped a bomb, of sorts, on modern American culture. ...

U.S. smoking warning made history, saved lives
USA Today - January 8, 2014

Health advocates are marking the 50th anniversary of the 1964 Surgeon General report on smoking with a call for more aggressive action to protect people from tobacco. That landmark report, along with subsequent Surgeon General reports on the addictive power of nicotine and the dangers of secondhand smoke, led to a sea change in the country's attitude toward tobacco. Smoking rates have dropped by 59%, and many communities now ban smoking in public places. No other single report has had this large of an effect on public health, says Thomas Frieden, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. ...

Leading Health Groups Call for Bold Action to End the Tobacco Epidemic In the United States Nation Challenged to Cut Smoking Rates to Under 10 Percent in 10 Years and Protect All Americans from Secondhand Smoke within 5 years
Wheeler Report - January 8, 2014

WASHINGTON, DC – As the United States marks the 50th
anniversary of the first Surgeon General’s Report on Smoking and Health, seven leading public health and medical organizations today called for a new national commitment to end the tobacco epidemic for good.

American Lung Association and Other Leading Public Health
Organizations Recognize 50th Anniversary of First Surgeon General’s Report on Smoking and Health
American Lung Association - January 8, 2014

Today, the American Lung Association joined other leading public health and medical organizations to commemorate the 50th anniversary, on Saturday January 11, of the first Surgeon General’s report on smoking and health. At the event, the organizations issued a call for a nationwide commitment to “make tobacco history” by ending the tobacco epidemic for good.

American Cancer Society and American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network Mark 50th Anniversary of Surgeon General's Report on Tobacco and Health, Cite Remarkable Progress
But Groups Say Work Remains to Further Reduce Number Of Lives Lost to Smoking-Related Cancers
PRNewswire - January 8, 2014

ATLANTA, Jan. 8, 2014 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- As the nation marks the 50th anniversary this month of the first U.S. Surgeon General's Report on Tobacco and Health, the American Cancer Society and its nonpartisan advocacy affiliate, the American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network (ACS CAN), point to remarkable progress in the fight against tobacco and the resulting lives saved from cancer. Since the release of the landmark report in 1964, the percentage of American adults who smoke has been cut by more than half, down from over 40 percent to less than 20 percent today. But with more than 43million Americans still lighting up and tobacco use remaining the single largest preventable cause of premature death in the United States, the Society and ACS CAN say they are committed to further reducing smoking and saving more lives from cancer. ...

Surgeon General Report: 50th Anniversary: Resources for Partners
Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids - January 8, 2014

Downloadable slide show: Charts showing progress since 1964 ...

American Heart Association Joins Health Groups to Commemorate the 50th Anniversary of the 1964 Surgeon General’s Report on Tobacco

Washington, D.C., Jan. 8, 2014 – The American Heart Association joined with six leading health groups today to honor the 50th anniversary of the first U.S. Surgeon General’s Report on smoking and health, and to call for a commitment to three public health goals. The goals are – reducing smoking rates to less than 10 percent within 10 years; protecting all Americans from secondhand smoke within five years; and ending the health impacts, including heart disease and stroke, caused by tobacco addiction. The other groups issuing the call to action are the American Academy of Pediatrics, American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network, American Lung Association, Americans for Nonsmokers' Rights, Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids and Legacy. ...

Thank You, Surgeon General: Tobacco Control Has Saved 8 Million Lives
TIME Healthland - January 8, 2014

Deemed the “most successful public health campaign in modern history,” researchers report that 50 years of tobacco control have saved about 20 years of additional life for eight million Americans. ...

50 Years Later: Legacy Resolves to Work Toward Generation Free
Legacy Foundation - January 8, 2014

January 2014 marks the 50th anniversary of the first Surgeon General's Report on Smoking and Health. Although we now know that tobacco use causes a host of cancers and other illnesses and is still the leading preventable cause of death in the United States, the 1964 landmark report was the first to definitively link smoking with lung cancer and heart disease – forever changing Americans’ understanding of the deadly consequences of smoking. ...

Pediatricians, cancer groups ask regulators to help cut tobacco use
The Oncology Report - January 8, 2014

WASHINGTON A coalition of health groups including the American Academy of Pediatrics, the American Heart Association, and the American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network are urging regulators to help the nation achieve at least an 8% reduction in adult smoking rates by 2024. Smoking kills 440,000 Americans a year and leads to $193 billion in health costs, according to the coalition, which also includes the American Lung Association, the Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids, the Legacy Foundation, and Americans for Nonsmokers Rights.

Antismoking Policies Have Saved More Than 8 Million Lives
National Journal - January 8, 2014

Antismoking policies have saved more than 8 million lives in the 50 years since a landmark surgeon general's report connecting smoking to cancer and other diseases, according to a new study from the Journal of the American Medical Association. "The tobacco industry remains a huge obstacle in our efforts to pass good, smoke-free laws, to increase excise taxes, to secure full funding for tobacco cessation and prevention programs, and to increase regulation of tobacco-related products, such as e-cigarettes," said Cynthia Hallett, executive director of Americans for Nonsmokers' Rights. Still, half the population does not live in areas of the country with smoke-free laws in workplaces, restaurants, and bars, according to Americans for Nonsmokers' Rights, and CDC says smoking costs the U.S. roughly $193 billion annually in health care expenditures and lost productivity. ...

War on smoking, at 50, turns to teens: Our view
USA Today - January 8, 2014

The war on smoking, now five decades old and counting, is one of the nation's greatest public health success stories but not for everyone. As a whole, the country has made amazing progress. In 1964, four in ten adults in the U.S. smoked; today fewer than two in ten do. But some states Kentucky, South Dakota and Alabama, to name just a few seem to have missed the message that smoking is deadly. ...

End the Tobacco Epidemic for Good
National Press Club - January 7, 2014

Health Leaders to Mark 50th Anniversary Of First Surgeon Generals Report on Smoking and Health, Call for Bold Action to End the Tobacco Epidemic for Good WASHINGTON, DC Leading public health and medical organizations will hold a press conference at 10 am on January 8, 2014, to recognize the 50th anniversary of the first Surgeon Generals report on smoking and health and call for a national commitment to end the tobacco epidemic for good.
Who: Cynthia Hallett, Executive Director, Americans for Nonsmokers' Rights

Podcast: Clearing the Air
US Surgeon General Site (DHHS) - January 7, 2014

Narrator: 2014 marks the 50th anniversary of the first Surgeon Generals Report on smoking and health. This series of podcasts celebrates the progress madeand the work still to be doneto end tobacco-related disease and death. .. Today, Cynthia Hallett, Executive Director of Americans for Nonsmokers Rights, describes her sense of urgency to clear the air of secondhand smoke in all workplaces, so that workers will no longer have to make a choice between their health and a paycheck ...

Commemorating the 50th Anniversary of the Surgeon Generals Report on Smoking and Health
US Surgeon General Site (DHHS) - January 7, 2014

Fifty years after the release of the first Surgeon General's Report on Smoking and Health, remarkable progress has been made. Since 1964, smoking prevalence among U.S. adults has been reduced by half. Unfortunately, tobacco use remains the leading preventable cause of disease, disability, and death in the United States. In 2014, we commemorate the 50th anniversary of the Surgeon Generals Report on Smoking and Health. In this podcast, Cynthia Hallett, Executive Director of Americans for Nonsmokers Rights, talks about her sense of urgency to clear the air of secondhand smoke so everyone is equally protected from the negative health effects caused by smoking in the workplace. Listen to Podcast: Clearing the Air

50 Years Since Warning, Tobacco Remains Our Nation's Mt. Everest
Huffington Post - January 6, 2014

On Jan. 11. 1964, Luther Terry made the following declaration: "There is a very strong relationship, and probably a causal relationship, between heart disease and cigarette smoking."

Historic smoking report marks 50th anniversary
New Pittsburgh Courier AP, Mike Stobbe - January 5, 2014

ATLANTA (AP) Fifty years ago, ashtrays seemed to be on every table and desk. Athletes and even Fred Flintstone endorsed cigarettes in TV commercials. Smoke hung in the air in restaurants, offices and airplane cabins. More than 42 percent of U.S. adults smoked, and there was a good chance your doctor was among them.

Tobacco Myths Persist 50 Years After the US Surgeon General First Warned Americans of the Dangers of Smoking
The Almagest - January 5, 2014

Tobacco misconceptions prevail in the United States despite the dramatic drop in smoking rates since the release of the first Surgeon Generals Report on smoking and health in January 1964. Experts at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center dispel common myths and share new educational resources to address this persistent challenge.

News & Press Releases | Research Studies
The Health Consequences of Smoking - 50 Years of Progress: A Report of the Surgeon General
SurgeonGeneral.gov - [January 21, 2014]
Schumacher, M.; Rucker, G.; Schwarzer, G., "Meta-analysis and the Surgeon General's Report on Smoking and Health," New England Journal of Medicine 370(2): 186-188, January 9, 2014.
Schroeder, S.A.; Koh, H.K., "Tobacco control 50 years after the 1964 Surgeon General's Report," Journal of the American Medical Association 311(2): 141-143, January 8, 2014.
Alberg, A.J.; Shopland, D.R.; Cummings, K.M., "The 2014 Surgeon General's Report: commemorating the 50th Anniversary of the 1964 Report of the Advisory Committee to the US Surgeon General and updating the evidence on the health consequences of cigarette smoking," American Journal of Epidemiology [Epub ahead of print], January 15, 2014.
Antman, E.; Arnett, D.; Jessup, M.; Sherwin, C., "The 50th Anniversary of the US Surgeon General's Report on Tobacco: what we've accomplished and where we go from here," Journal of the American Heart Association 3(1): e000740, 2014.
Warner , K.E., "50 years since the first Surgeon General’s Report on Smoking and Health: a happy anniversary?," American Journal of Public Health 104(1): 5-8, January 2014.
Glantz, S.A.; Johnson, K.C., "The Surgeon General Report on Smoking and Health 50 years later: breast cancer and the cost of increasing caution," Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention 23(1): 37-46, January 2014.