Smokefree Threats

Smokefree Threats2018-07-02T16:39:07+00:00

Smokefree Air Is Still A Dream For Many Nonsmokers

ANR Foundation Is Dedicated To Creating Healthy, Smokefree Air for All Through Education About the Harms of Secondhand Smoke and the Benefits of Smokefree Air

Health Disparities in Exposure

As of July 2018, 41% of the US population live in places still not covered by a strong smokefree workplace law at either the local or state level. There are big disparities in workplace exposure based on the simple geography of local, state, and Tribal smokefree laws as well as by occupation. Employees in the hospitality service industry are the most exposed, such as the large workforces within the growing number of casino complexes and gambling venues in many states. These venues can include convention facilities, hotels, and shopping districts all within one indoor shared air space.

Many people are also exposed to secondhand smoke in blue collar work settings like warehouses and in a wide range of public places such as airports, hotels, entryways, or sporting events.

The ANR Foundation supports everyone’s right to breathe smokefree air where they work, live, and play. No one should have to get sick or from breathing in their home, their job, or in a public place.

Map of smokefree laws in the U.S.

Smokefree Air Threats

The ANR Foundation primarily focuses on threats to smokefree air, including secondhand tobacco smokesecondhand marijuana smokethirdhand smoke residues, emissions from electronic smoking devices (ESDs), also known as electronic cigarettes, and problematic ventilation systems.

Many smokefree laws do not cover ESDs since these products did not exist when many laws were drafted. Likewise, many do not cover marijuana smoking, since it is only in recent years that medical and recreational use of marijuana have been legalized in some states.

Our sister organization, Americans for Nonsmokers’ Rights, lobbies for smokefree laws nationwide and has various smokefree air campaigns in progress, as well as campaigns regarding marijuana smoke and electronic cigarettes.